Advice for Mother at the time of Birth ~Spiritual Midwifery

“At a birthing, the mother is the main channel of life force. If she is cooperative and selfless and brave, it makes there be more energy for everyone, including her baby who is getting born. Giving somebody some makes you and everyone else feel good. You don’t have your baby out yet to cuddle and hold; so giving the midwives and your husband some is giving your baby some. If you are in a hospital, you can make there be more energy by finding someone you can connect and be friends with.

During a rush, keep your eyes open, and keep paying attention to those around you and to what’s happening. If you feel afraid or if something is happening that makes you uptight, report it—the midwives can help sort it out until it feels good.

Don’t complain, it makes things worse. If you usually complain, practice not doing it during pregnancy. It will build character.

Talk nice; it will keep your bottom loose so it can open up easier. It’s okay to ask the midwives or your husband to do something for you, like rub your legs or get a glass of water. Ask real nice and give folks “folks some when they do something for you.

Be grateful that you’re having a baby, and be grateful to your partner who’s helping you—it’s an experience that you only do a few times in your life, so make the very most of it, and get your head in a place where you can get as high as possible.

Remember you have a real, live baby in there. Sometimes it’s such an intense trip having a baby that you can forget what it’s for!

Learn how to relax—it’s something that requires attention. You may have to put out some effort to gather your attention together enough that you can relax.

Keep your sense of humor—it’s a priceless gem which keeps you remembering where it’s at. If you can’t be a hero, you can at least be funny while being a chicken.

Remember your monkey self knows how to do this really well. Your brain isn’t very reliable as a guide of how to be during childbirth, but your monkey self is.”

Excerpt From: Ina May Gaskin. “Spiritual Midwifery.” Book Publishing Company. iBooks.

Check out this book on the iBooks Store: https://itun.es/us/JjV4x.l

Doctor in Queens, NY Delivers Breech Babies!

Great news from the community of Birth workers in New York that has many of us shouting for joy and some of us just glad the news is out.

As a student of midwifery I have learned enough about breech deliveries to know that delivering babies breech is very possible when educated in the proper techniques. It is all to normal for me to be shocked upon hearing news that an obstetrician in a hospital has delivered healthy babies who’ve been in a breech position.

My path to midwifery is leading me up a road led by ground shaking, standard setting, statistic proving, midwives known to be the Farm Midwives of Summertown, Tennessee who have pioneered modern day midwifery and gained the respect back for the ancient practice. My education with these wonderful woman has allowed me to learn about the different techniques that are used to delivery breech babies. These techniques are not generally taught in Universities anymore to students of Maternal-Fetal Medicine & Obstetrics & Gynecology. Reasons such as this is why many women are opting to study the ancient craft of midwifery to gain the hands on experience as well as the educational portion of the practice instead of just going to a University and only learning everything from a text.

I am grateful to have wonderful teachers that prepare me for a career of unexpected events that will allow me to save lives and empower a mum through her labor.

With the sketchy laws in NYC still tippy toeing around midwifery being illegal depending on what certification the Professional has. It is good to know that mums who op’t for hospital births can trust that some OBGYNs are prepared for the unexpected at birth without having to consider unnecessary interventions.

 

For Mum’s expecting and or possibly having a breech delivery, here is the Dr. you should know about…
Dr Georges Sylvestre at Flushing Hospital.
He accepts all insurance including Medicaid.
He accepts a transfer of care at 38 weeks.

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Midwifery Myths Set Straight by ourmomentoftruth.com

The profession of midwifery has evolved with today’s modern health care system. But there are many myths about midwives in the United States based on centuries-old images or simple misunderstandings. You might be surprised to learn the truth about some of these common midwifery myths.

 

True or False?

Midwives have no formal education.

FALSE. Most midwives in the United States have a master’s degree and are required to pass a national certification exam. There are many different types of midwives, each holding different certifications based on their education and/or experience. Certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) and certified midwives (CMs) attend approximately 93% of all midwife-attended births in the United States, and as of 2010 they are required to have a master’s degree in order to practice midwifery.

Midwives and physicians work together.

TRUE. CNMs and CMs work with all members of the health care team, including physicians. Midwifery care fits well with the services provided by obstetrician/gynecologists (OB/GYNs), who are experts in high risk, medical complications, and surgery. By working with OB/GYNs, midwives can ensure that a specialist is available if a high-risk condition should arise. Likewise, many OB/GYN practices include midwives who specialize in care for women through normal, healthy life events. In this way, all women can receive the right care for their individual health care needs.

Midwives only focus on pregnancy and birth.

FALSE. Midwives have expert knowledge and skill in caring for women through pregnancy, birth, and the postpartum period. But they also do much more. CNMs and CMs provide health care services to women in all stages of life, from the teenage years through menopause, including general health check-ups, screenings and vaccinations; pregnancy, birth, and postpartum care; well woman gynecologic care; treatment of sexually transmitted infections; and prescribing medications, including all forms of pain control medications and birth control.

Midwives can prescribe medications and order tests.

TRUE. CNMs and CMs are licensed to prescribe a full range of substances, medications, and treatments, including pain control medications and birth control. They can also order needed medical tests within their scope of practice and consistent with state laws and practice guidelines.

Midwives cannot care for me if I have a chronic health condition or my pregnancy is considered high-risk.

FALSE. Midwives are able to provide different levels of care depending on a woman’s individual health needs. If you have a chronic health condition, a midwife still may be able to provide some or all of your direct care services. In other cases, a midwife may play a more of a supportive role and help you work with other health care providers to address your personal health care challenges. In a high-risk pregnancy, a midwife can help you access resources to support your goals for childbirth, provide emotional support during challenging times, or work alongside specialists who are experts in your high-risk condition to ensure safe, healthy outcomes.

Midwives offer pain relief to women during labor.

TRUE. Midwives are leading experts in how to cope with labor pain. As a partner with you in your health care, your midwife will explain pain relief options and help you develop a birth plan that best fits your personal needs and desires. Whether you wish to use methods such as relaxation techniques or movement during labor or try IV, epidural, or other medications, your midwife will work with you to help meet your desired approach to birth. At the same time, your midwife will provide you with information and resources about the different options and choices available if any changes to your birth plan become necessary or if you change your mind.

Midwives only attend births at home.

FALSE. Midwives practice in many different settings, including hospitals, medical offices, free-standing birth centers, clinics, and/or private settings (such as your home). In fact, because many women who choose a midwife for their care wish to deliver their babies in a hospital, many hospitals in the United States offer an in-house midwifery service. And because midwives are dedicated to one-on-one care, many practice in more than one setting to help ensure that women have access to the range of services they need or desire and to allow for specific health considerations. In 2012, about 95% of births attended by midwives in the United States were in hospitals.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15YAObX_lrM#action=share

Knowing your Uterus – Retroverted Uterus P.1

Many women including myself have swayed through life not understanding why we suffer from health disparities. We often face issues like PCOS: Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, PMS, Fibroids, experience miscarriages, and infertility for years without understanding why and usually are told to treat the pain and discomfort with drugs rather than being educated about the cause of the syndrome and encouraged to create a lifestyle suited for our personal predispositions.

An exam may be necessary  

I was once lucky enough to have visited the most prestigious Emergency room I have ever been to. While living in Thomasville, NC when I started feeling lower abdominal pain in fear of it being cyst like I’ve had before, I was referred to an OB-GYN that was adequately trained. This OB was doing my follow up and wanted to thoroughly exam my pelvis to understand why I was having pain near my ovaries. After I mentioned having once suffered a horrific burst of an ovarian cyst that left me on bed rest for almost a month; She wanted to rule out all worst case scenarios. This doctor felt a sonogram was not sufficient therefore she went on to perform a vaginal sonogram on me. It was a bit nerve wrecking for me because I was not sexually active at the time but the information she provided me with during this exam made the whole examination worth it. My boyfriend at the time held my hand through the exam and made the experience less dreadful. This doctor proceeded to educate me about my uterus being retroverted.Image result for retroverted uterus

A retroverted uterus (tilted uterus, tipped uterus) is auterus that is tilted posteriorly. This is in contrast to the slightly “anteverted” uterus that most women have, which is tipped forward toward the bladder, with the anterior end slightly concave.

Symptoms of a retroverted uterus

Generally, a retroverted uterus does not cause any problems. If problems do occur, it will probably be because the woman has an associated disorder like endometriosis. A disorder like this could cause the following symptoms:

A range of causes for a retroverted uterus

Some of the causes of a retroverted uterus include:

Sexual problems

In most cases of retroverted uterus, the ovaries and fallopian tubes are tipped backwards too. This means that all of these structures can be ‘butted’ by the head of the penis during intercourse. This is known as ‘collision dyspareunia’. The woman-on-top position usually causes the most pain. It is possible for vigorous sex in this position to injure or tear the ligaments surrounding the uterus.

Fertility issues

It is thought that a retroverted uterus has no bearing on a woman’s fertility.

Retroverted uterus and pregnancy

In most cases, a retroverted uterus doesn’t interfere with pregnancy. After the first trimester, the expanding uterus lifts out of the pelvis and, for the remainder of the pregnancy, assumes the typical forward-tipped position.

In a small percentage of cases, the growing uterus is ‘snagged’ on pelvic bone (usually the sacrum). This condition is known as ‘incarcerated uterus’. The symptoms usually occur somewhere between weeks 12 and 14, and can include pain and difficulties passing urine.

Things to remember

Since learning about being with a retroverted uterus I realized how my physiology differed from other women. 1 in 6 women are born with a retroverted uterus. Some may live their wholes lives not knowing unless they inquire to find out or they experience some of the disparities I was dealt. Some of the causes are, painful sex, yeast infections due to high levels of acid in your ph., and painful periods. Some women learn about having this, way into their pregnancy and if their lucky enough they will have a Doula, who will instruct them on how to minimize the nausea episodes and perhaps provide some insight on why it is detrimental to eat the right foods for a more comfortable and easy going pregnancy.

It is very important to understand that our body parts are not separated. We often lose sight of the truth being that everything is connected and in tuned especially when we are not in tuned with our own bodies. We often pop a pill an ignore aches and pains when it can very well be our body telling us to pay attention BEFORE something goes wrong. I was grateful to have learned about my beautifully unique uterus because I was able to change my diet and life style in order to prevent things like fibroids, endometriosis, PMS and more. I learned early that my diet effects my PH-balance and if my PH (hormones) are off then my body becomes a home for disease and ailments especially when I am already sensitive because of the way I was created.

Before we continue our lives not knowing how magical and intricate our bodies are I hope we can all become a bit more curious about our Uterus’ and how different they can all be. Perhaps now we can tend to our personal needs as women and not be shocked when sudden issues begin to effect our health during our child bearing years.

The good news is that in most cases it is possible to have a baby if you have one of these uterine abnormalities:
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Uterus didelphys
This is an uncommon abnormality where the uterus has two inner cavities. Each cavity may lead to its own cervix and vagina. This means there are two cervixes and two vaginas. It affects about one in 350 women.

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Unicornuate uterus 

A unicornuate uterus is half the size of a normal uterus and there is only one fallopian tube. Because of its shape, it is described as a uterus with one horn. It is a rare abnormality, affecting about one in 1,000 women. It develops in the earliest stages of life, when the tissue that forms the uterus does not grow properly. If you have a unicornuate uterus, you probably have two ovaries but only one will be connected to your uterus.
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Bicornuate uterus
Instead of being pear-shaped, this type of uterus looks more like a heart, with a deep indentation at the top. It is called a uterus with two horns, because of its shape. It’s thought that fewer than one woman in 200 women has a bicornuate uterus.

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Septate uterus

This is where the inside of the uterus is divided by a muscular or fibrous wall, called the septum. About one woman in 45 women is affected. The septum may extend only part way into the uterus (partial septate uterus) or it may reach as far as the cervix (complete septate uterus). Partial or subseptates are more common than complete septates. A septate uterus may make it more difficult for you to conceive.

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Arcuate uterus
This looks more like a normal uterus, except it has a dip, or slight indentation at the top. It is a common abnormality, affecting about a quarter of women.

About one in six women have a uterus that tilts backwards toward the spine (retroverted uterus). This is not an abnormality. It won’t affect how your baby grows, although it may mean your bump starts to show later than for other women.

http://www.babycentre.co.uk/a551934/abnormalities-of-the-uterus-in-pregnancy#ixzz3yO1RFZ9i

I Hate Average Podcast – Average Jay

Ep. 15 Yasmintheresa Garcia Founder of the IbiOp App
Published on Sep 12, 2016

“We’re back took a little break for labor day hope you all enjoyed. Excited about the direction of the show and its only getting better! Today we had a chance to speak with Yasmintheresa Garcia she lets us know the origin of her work as a Doula. Describes her passion for help and informing our community about pregnancy and other health concerns. Excited to talk about the launch of her new App IbiOp where people can easily find information on Doulas and Midwives near them.”

Check us out on IG: @ihateaveragepodcast

Twitter/SC: @ihateaveragejay

Check out our website for some writings and more episode info:  Averagejay.com

The New York Amsterdam News — Millennial doula

The 21st century lends itself to a shift in the role of women in society. Inspirational women have been around for centuries, with the 1990s giving birth to the next generation of creative and exceptional female activists.

At 24 years old, Yasmintheresa Garcia is one such outstanding individual. A Brooklyn native born to Afro-Dominican parents, she recognized her calling as a doula from a very young age. In addition to successfully managing her own doula practice, Ythedoula, Garcia is a midwife in training, community activist and vegan health coach. Doulas are not medically licensed.

Garcia gained interest in the vocation at the age of 12, when a number of fellow students became pregnant. “I started giving them advice and giving them emotional and educational support that they needed that they weren’t receiving from the community they lived in,” said Garcia in an interview.

Community uplift and female education is the reason Garcia has created a get together called Ythegirlshangout. A group for women of all ages and backgrounds come together in a sacred space to discuss everything from financial literacy to career goals and body images. “Things that we in our culture wouldn’t normally speak of in our household,” said Garcia.

Click to continue to read the rest of the article published; Or pick up your paper copy out now!

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http://amsterdamnews.com/news/2016/aug/25/millennial-doulayasmintheresa-garcia/#at_pco=smlwn-1.0&at_si=57bef933ff280040&at_ab=per-2&at_pos=0&at_tot=1

Let Your Voice Be Heard Presents: The Dreamer and Doer Series Featuring: Yasmintheresa Garcia

Each month, Let Your Voice Be Heard! Radio presents “The Dreamer and Doer Series,” which spotlights inspirational Millennials who are using their talents and influence to better their community and the world. In July 2016, we spoke to Yasmintheresa Garcia, the founder of YtheGirls “Hang out,” a Midwife in training, Prenatal & Postnatal Doula, Childbirth Educator, Vegan health coach and Acupressurist.

 

A Calling before a Career

 

Being a birth Doula or Midwife consist of two different responsibilities. It is not a hobby or a job you do because it seems easy. It is not a job for the weak minded or selfish hearted.

Being a Doula is a metaphysical calling on your soul to want to be apart of ushering in new life knowing that you will do more Good than harm as a gatekeeper of the cycle of life. What both a Midwife & Doula do have in common is that both roles have a responsibility to educate & empower their clients in order to make evidence based decisions that are best for their family in respect to their culture. We are pretty much the gate keepers of the human life cycle we often witness death and birth at the same time. Perhaps in most cases death of an old life style and birth of a new life and new adventure of a whole family. How we practice in both roles has a major effect on how that family will transition into, and operate in their new life style. 

Be passionate about your calling in life and live it to the fullest. ~YtheDoula