Surprise! Pitocin Is Linked to Postpartum Depression | Mother Rising

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Pitocin®, a synthetic form of oxytocin, is routinely given to women before, during and immediately following birth to induce and augment labor and to also prevent and treat postpartum hemorrhage.  Much to the surprise of the medical community, a recent study showed that Pitocin® is linked to postpartum depression and anxiety.

The mothers aren’t surprised.

For women with a history of depression or anxiety prior to pregnancy, receiving Pitocin® increased the risk of postpartum depression or anxiety by 36%.

For women with no prior history of depression or anxiety, receiving Pitocin® increased their risk of postpartum depression or anxiety by 32%.

Let that sink in for a moment.

I Bet the Numbers Are Even Higher

While I pondered these incredibly high numbers, it occurred to me that the numbers may actually be higher.

The information used in the research study came from women that received a diagnosis and/or a psychotropic medication.  What about those that didn’t seek help?

In my experience, for whatever reason, many women do not seek professional help when experiencing postpartum anxiety and/or depression.

How many anxious or depressed mothers never confide to their care providers about what they’re feeling?  Or even worse, were dismissed and told “everything will be fine”.

It’s Not Just in Our Heads

Even if the numbers may be higher, the research as is, is incredibly validating.  Ladies, what you are feeling is not “just in your head”.  It’s real, and it’s a big problem (that society has no idea how to handle).

*For a list of symptoms of postpartum mood disorders please visit Postpartum Progress.  (Postpartum Progress is a non-profit that aims to raise awareness, fight stigma and provide peer support and programming to women with maternal mental illness.)

Pitocin Is Not the Same as Oxytocin

The strangest thing about the research study was that the hypothesis was the opposite of what made sense to me as a mother and childbirth educator.  The hypothesis suggested that synthetic oxytocin, Pitocin, would in fact lower postpartum depression and anxiety.

The underlying assumption I am gathering is that, despite the evidence, medical professionals believe that Pitocin® is the same as oxytocin.

A few years ago I was attending a Pitocin® induction at my local hospital.  My doula client was struggling BIG TIME with the sudden wave after wave of strong, painful contractions.  Her nurse, not knowing what else to do, told her, “this is just labor, honey”.  As if what she was experiencing were normal labor sensations.  How sad.

Believe me, Pitocin® does not feel warm and fuzzy, and isn’t “just like labor”.  My pitocin augmentation birth was much harder than my first two births.  For me, Pitocin® made my active labor phase feel like the transition phase, and lasted far longer than the transition phases I had experienced in my non-Pitocin® births.

Oxytocin is Needed to Mother Well

Oxytocin, on the other hand, is helpful for coping with stress, supporting emotional and mental well-being and also helps with bonding – which are absolutely necessary for a successful transition to motherhood. (source)

Another study showed that women given Pitocin in labor had low oxytocin levels during breastfeeding.  This revealed that the exposure to Pitocin® has consequences that last on into mothering. (source)

What About the Baby?

If oxytocin is an important hormone for becoming a mother and synthetic oxytocin is linked to postpartum depression, anxiety and low oxytocin during breastfeeding.  I can’t help but wonder – what about the baby?

If oxytocin effects how women transform into mothers, how is this synthetic hormone affecting the baby?

How is the baby affected by synthetic oxytocin before, during and after labor?

Frighteningly, we have no idea.

Re-Examine Routine Procedures

If Pitocin® is linked to postpartum depression and causes a lack of oxytocin during the postpartum period, maybe it’s time to re-evlatulate the use of Pitocin® as it pertains to each woman.  (Never mind the baby…)

According to the CDC, induction has more than doubled from 1990 (10%) to 2010 (23%). (source)  However, just because a procedure is routine does not mean that it’s a good enough reason to do it.

 

We Need More Research

I’m not suggesting to eliminate Pitocin®, as it is an important life saving tool in modern obstetrics.  (Shoot, I’ve even experienced it first hand!)  However, because the consequences of routine childbirth interventions such as Pitocin® on human maternal behavior have been understudied, it would be wise to limit the use of Pitocin® until further research is completed.

And if Pitocin® is deemed necessary, it would be wise and compassionate to provide quality postpartum care, especially to those with high risk factors for postpartum depression.

What if care providers were required to pay for 40 hours of postpartum doula services to women that received Pitocin®?  I bet we’d quickly see the true motivations behind the choices made in the care of new mothers.

Oxytocin is essential for our species to thrive as mothers.  Our current methods meddle with the mental health of these new mothers – the backbone of society.

Is the crumbling mental health of new mothers important enough for us to take action?

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Chrissy Teigen Believes Eating Her Placenta Helped Her Avoid Postpartum Depression After Second Baby BY ANDREA PARK

About a year after giving birth to daughter Luna, in April 2016, Chrissy Teigen penned a powerful essay for Glamour in which she described her experience with postpartum depression. In the essay, she says PPD left her unable to leave the couch for months at a time. Her experience in the months after welcoming son Miles in May, however, has thankfully been completely different. In a new preview of her upcoming interview with Rita Braver forCBS Sunday Morning‘s 40th anniversary primetime special (airing September 14), Teigen theorized why she was spared the pain of PPD this time around.

“It sounds ridiculous, but people have this belief that if you eat your placenta, it gets all those nutrients that you lost when you were pregnant, rather than just losing them immediately and losing that rush of endorphins,” she said. “By taking these dry placenta pills, you can kind of keep this energy up and be weaned off that feeling more. And I didn’t do that with Luna so…I remember looking back and being like, ‘I shoulda ate my placenta!'” When Braver said she didn’t think the cookbook author could include placenta as an ingredient in her cooking demonstration on the special, Teigen joked, “Really?! That’s not a normal thing? I’m in L.A., it’s very normal — they grill it here.”

 

Though it’s fantastic that Teigen hasn’t experienced PPD after her second pregnancy, there’s not actually any definitive research linking eating placenta to preventing depression or, in fact, to any other health benefits. According to Self, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention actually recommends that new moms avoid eating their placenta in capsule form since it could contain dangerous bacteria that can then be passed on to newborns via breastmilk or skin-to-skin contact. Additionally, women’s health expert Jennifer Wider, M.D., told Self that mothers who eat their placenta could also see an increased risk of blood clots as a result of ingesting extra estrogen. If you’re worried about PPD or any other potential post-birth conditions, your best bet is to talk it over with your doctor, who can recommend a (scientifically sound) course of action.

The 32-year-old also described another major life change she’s experienced since welcoming two kids and putting out two cookbooks. “I really prefer being happy and getting to eat things that I love, still wanting to be healthy,” the former Sports Illustrated swimsuit model told Braver. “But I just don’t care about looking good in a swimsuit anymore. I guess that’s the only way to put it.”

Just a few weeks ago, Teigen took to social media to talk about learning to love her body. “I think it’s awesome people have killer bodies and are proud to show them off (I really do!!), but I know how hard it can be to forget what (for lack of a better word) regular ol’ bodies look like when everyone looks bonkers amazing,” she wrote on Twitter after sharing a video of herself after giving birth to her two children, complete with stretch marks. She added, “Also I don’t really call this ‘body confidence’ because I’m not quite there yet. I’m still super insecure. I’m just happy that I can make anyone else out there feel better about themselves!”

 

PAMPERS DIAPERS ARE ABOUT TO GET MORE EXPENSIVE

EXPECT TO SEE SLIGHT PRICE HIKES STARTING THIS FALL.

PUBLISHED ON 08/02/2018

Parents know just how quickly you can blow through a stash of diapers—and for every wet nappy you toss, your mental cash register tallies up the cents you just spent. It’s estimated that families spend $2,000 to $3,000 on diapers alone in those first two years. Unfortunately, that price tag may be getting even higher, now that Pampers is jacking up their prices.

Procter & Gamble, Pampers’ parent company, announced this week they’re raising prices for Pampers diapers by an average of 4 percent, although the exact increase will depend on the size and type of diaper as well as the retailer.

Before you get too upset, a 4 percent price hike likely won’t break the bank. According to MarketWatch, Target sells a 100-count pack of Pampers Swaddlers diapers for $25. With the increase, the cost will be about $26. It’s not great, but it’s likely not going to be a total deal-breaker.

So why the jump in price? Procter & Gamble pointed to the rising cost of pulp, a raw material used to make disposable diapers, and higher transportation and freight costs. This isn’t the first time they’ve had to raise their prices, and it likely won’t be the last. In 2011, P&G and Kimberly-Clark Corp., the company that makes Huggies diapers, upped their price points for similar reasons.

For now, the new higher prices are expected to roll out between October and December, making now is a good time to stock up on Pampers if you’re looking to save a few dollars.

 

If you’re going to buy in bulk from Amazon, a word of warning: Be on the lookout for counterfeit diapers. There have been multiple reports of people buying what they believe are Pampers brand diapers, only to discover they’ve actually purchased lesser quality fake versions when the package finally arrives. If the price looks too good to be true, it probably is.

PHOTO: Courtesy Manufacturer

Waist beads, and how they’re keeping me fit!

Earlier this year my Sacred Woman sisters introduced me to the beautiful traditions of waist beads that had originated from our Nubian ancestors of Ancient Kemet. I kept telling myself I would eventually get them but when I got them around this time last month it was the best thing I ever did for my womanhood. As an afro-dominican, my culture has discouraged so much of our beautiful and imperative African traditions claiming most of them pertaining to women to be taboo. I recall being a Teen and having my father become so upset with me when he would find me wearing ankle bracelets. He being such a prideful man, never needed to give me an excuse for why I was not aloud to wear them and I would of course, hide it from him when I did. One day when I got older I asked him why it bothered him so much when he found me wearing it again, this time with determination not to take it off without a valid explanation from him as to why he was so opposed to me wearing an accessory on my own foot.  My father when on to tell me that he disliked me wearing ankles and toe rings because it was for hoers. Imagine my facial expression trying so hard to understand what kind of experience my dad may have had that made him feel such a way about a woman adorning her legs with jewels. Needles to say that with all do respect I could not continue to consider my dads incredibly ridiculous wish and reasoning for what I wore on my body. I continued to love my body accessories. I later began to research more about the history of why African women (& Africans of the diaspora) traditionally adorned their beautiful bodies with jewels. Then I met my sisters and two of them being sacred waist bead creators, I knew I had to finally get some of my own and truly embrace my womanhood.

Waist beads keep me fit and feeling sexy 

The moment my graduation of Queen Afua’s Sacred Woman Rites of passage program came to completion I got the opportunity to purchase my waist beads from my sis, Zanetta who fitted me on the spot and adorned me with two of her creations one, slightly snug and the other perfectly fitting to my waist. One made of regular stones and the other made with Womb healing stones. She blessed me with fitting me so perfectly into these beads that somehow I knew now that I had to get back to having a slimmer waistline in order to not feel uncomfortable wearing these beads. My body type is one that when I drink or eat too much I am immediately bloated. I understand the physiology of my intricate body and now these waist beads made me keep my body on check when eating, sleeping and exercising. Having my body adorned with waist beads didn’t mean that I will only feel super sexy and beautiful in my own skin every time I saw myself in the mirror but it also meant that I would now be cautious of the way I took care of my body in order to make sure the waist beads fit my waist and flattered me for myself and for my love. These waist beads have been a godsend. Now I am more in love with my midsection. I protect it more from harmful food and neglect and I am also determined to do core ab exercises daily to make sure my stomach matches the sexiness of my beads. I like my stomach flat and fit and these beads motivate me to keep it this way.

August 2016 Favorites* https://ythegarcia.com/2016/08/23/waist-beads/

Keep reading below and be astonished as to how these beads are actually made to keep women, their wombs and abdomen healthy and fit. I found this article by a Ghanaian bead maker based out of Georgia and I had to share it here for you all to read. Enjoy! Support and get your beads, beauties. *Quick note before these wack copy cat celebrities catch on to this traditional accessory and try and call it their trend just remember we have been adorning our temples since the beginning of time. So be your true self today before some else takes your culture and sells it back to you tomorrow.*

Waist by Wednesday 

The history of waist beads dates back to antiquity. Many believe that the history begins in ancient Egypt where they were called “girdles” and were worn by women as a status symbol. In West Africa, the tradition was made popular by the Yoruban tribe of Nigeria. They are worn as a celebration of womanhood, sexuality, femininity, fertility, healing, spirituality, body shaping, protection and wealth.

Yoruban woman are known to have once laced beads with charms and fragrances that would be considered irresistible to the opposite sex. This practice is now less popular, however wearing beads for the seduction of men is still one of the primary reasons some women wear them. Waist beads can be considered as “African Lingerie.”

Most of Waists by Wednesday’s beads are imported from Ghana, which also has a rich tradition of wearing waist beads. It is common for women in Ghana to wear waist beads as ornaments, as well as for symbolic adornment, which serves as a sign of wealth, femininity or aristocracy, as well as spiritual well-being. During Ghanaian naming ceremonies, babies are typically adorned with waist beads, while young adults also wear beads around their waists and on their hips during puberty rites as a portrayal of femininity. These beads are believed to possess the power to attract as well as evoke deep emotional responses.

As part of Ghanaian tradition, a successful suitor would commission a set of beads including bracelets, anklets, necklaces, cuffs and waist beads for his bride. This was part of her dowry and the foundation of her personal wealth. Women in Ghana would wear multiple strands of beads around their waist, with some cultures providing that the only person allowed to remove them was her husband on their wedding night.

Many Ghanaian women will tell you that they use their waist beads to shape their waist. It is believed that the practice of wearing multiple waist beads over time will help to keep the waist small and accentuate the hips. Since traditional waist beads are strung on cotton cord (and without a clasp/hook) they can be a good tool to measure weight gain and loss. They will not stretch; they will either break or continue to roll up the waist when weight has been gained. Similarly, they will roll down or eventually become so loose they will fall off when weight has been lost.

Don’t be fooled by photos of only slender women wearing waist beads. Women of all shapes and sizes can confidently adorn themselves with waist beads as well. Because traditionally beads are worn along your panty or bikini line and not your actual waist (which is typically across the belly button), it allows for all women to comfortably wear waist beads no matter their size. Wearing them is really a personal reflection and appreciation for your God-given beauty.