Doulas: Should you hire a labor coach?

What’s a doula?

A birth doula is a trained labor coach who assists you during labor and delivery. She provides you with continuous emotional support, as well as assistance with other non-medical aspects of your care.

Doulas charge several hundred to a thousand dollars for their services, which are seldom covered by health insurance. Some, however, are willing to work on a sliding scale based on your ability to pay. A few pioneering hospitals even provide doulas to laboring patients who want them.

You can also hire a postpartum doula to come to your home after the birth to help you settle in with your new baby.

What are the advantages of having a birth doula?

A doula helps you before labor and delivery by answering your questions about what to expect, easing your fears, helping you develop a birth plan, and generally getting you ready for the arrival of your baby.

During labor and delivery, a doula provides constant, knowledgeable support. She can make suggestions about positions during labor, help you with breathing through contractions, and provide massage. She can also answer questions you and your partner have about what’s happening.

It’s impossible to predict or control how birth and labor will go. Will you connect emotionally with your labor and delivery nurse, and will she have time for you? How will you react to the pain? Will you have a swift delivery or a long, drawn-out labor? How will your husband or partner hold up under the pressure?

Faced with these uncertainties, many women find enormous reassurance in having a doula by their side. Research has found that women who have continuous one-on-one support during labor tend to use pain medication less often, have slightly shorter labors, and are less likely to have a c-section or a forceps or vacuum-assisted delivery. In fact, if you’re serious about trying to give birth without pain medication, a doula may be your best ally.

Women who have continuous support are also more likely to report being satisfied with their birth experience. One theory is that mothers who have continuous support produce lower levels of stress hormones during labor than women left alone or attended by inexperienced coaches.

If you’re seeing a midwife in a low-volume hospital practice, or planning to give birth at a birth center or at home, you’re likely to have continuous one-on-one support from your midwife.

If you have your baby at a hospital, it’s likely to be a different story — and hiring a doula may be the only way to make sure an experienced coach will be with you throughout labor.

In a typical hospital setting, doctors and some midwives don’t stay in the room with you continuously during labor. Labor-and-delivery nurses often have to split their time between several patients, and they come and go according to their shifts.

What’s it like to have support from a doula during labor?

Everyone’s experience is different, of course, but here’s one woman’s story of a doula-assisted labor:

“Hiring a doula is like hiring somebody who’s there just for you. When I went into labor, our doula met us at the hospital. Eighteen babies were born in the hospital that day, so our labor and delivery nurse was quite happy to have someone else there to provide emotional support and help make me more comfortable.

“Having the doula gave me enormous confidence, plus it took the pressure off my husband. He was able to relax and enjoy the experience. The doula showed him some acupressure techniques he wanted to try.

“She locked eyes with me and helped me breathe through my contractions, making suggestions about moving around and trying different pain management techniques. She could read my body signals perfectly, and knew when I was in transition (when I got sick, a pan magically materialized). She helped me remember to drink fluids and communicate my needs to the nurses.

“When it was time to push, the doula put warm washcloths on my perineum and locked eyes with me again, which was absolutely critical.

“I couldn’t have done it without her. She made me fearless, and the lack of fear is what gets you through the pain without drugs. I had complete confidence in her. If I had been looking at my husband and saying, ‘Help me through this,’ it just wouldn’t have been the same.”

(Article from http://www.babycenter.com/0_doulas-should-you-hire-a-labor-coach_480.bc?page=1 )

How do I find a doula?

If you’re looking for a doula, try these resources:

Let Your Voice Be Heard Presents: The Dreamer and Doer Series Featuring: Yasmintheresa Garcia

Each month, Let Your Voice Be Heard! Radio presents “The Dreamer and Doer Series,” which spotlights inspirational Millennials who are using their talents and influence to better their community and the world. In July 2016, we spoke to Yasmintheresa Garcia, the founder of YtheGirls “Hang out,” a Midwife in training, Prenatal & Postnatal Doula, Childbirth Educator, Vegan health coach and Acupressurist.

 

A Calling before a Career

 

Being a birth Doula or Midwife consist of two different responsibilities. It is not a hobby or a job you do because it seems easy. It is not a job for the weak minded or selfish hearted.

Being a Doula is a metaphysical calling on your soul to want to be apart of ushering in new life knowing that you will do more Good than harm as a gatekeeper of the cycle of life. What both a Midwife & Doula do have in common is that both roles have a responsibility to educate & empower their clients in order to make evidence based decisions that are best for their family in respect to their culture. We are pretty much the gate keepers of the human life cycle we often witness death and birth at the same time. Perhaps in most cases death of an old life style and birth of a new life and new adventure of a whole family. How we practice in both roles has a major effect on how that family will transition into, and operate in their new life style. 

Be passionate about your calling in life and live it to the fullest. ~YtheDoula

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is a Doula vs. Midwife

[Article below is from   http://www.diffen.com/difference/Doula_vs_Midwife }

Childbirth today has several alternatives to the standard hospital experience with an obstetrician, and doula and midwife are just two of many.

A doula is an assistant who provides physical as well as emotional support during childbirth. She helps women in a non-medical capacity.

A midwife is a qualified professional from an institution of her country, which enables her to help a pregnant woman in delivering a baby. The World Health Organization defines a midwife as: A person who, having been regularly admitted to a midwifery educational program that is duly recognized in the country in which it is located, has successfully completed the prescribed course of studies in midwifery and has acquired the requisite qualifications to be registered and/or legally licensed to practice midwifery. The educational program may be an apprenticeship, a formal university program, or a combination.

Comparison chart

Doula versus Midwife comparison chart
  Doula Midwife
Definition A doula is an assistant who provides physical as well as emotional support during childbirth. She helps women in a non-medical capacity. A midwife is a qualified professional from an institution of her country, which enables her to help a pregnant woman in delivering a baby.
Duties Prenatal Doula aids with Educating women about their own choices regarding options for their upcoming birth of their child. Childbirth Doula helps the mother during labor and childbirth. Postpartum Doula offers services after the child is born Aids with preventive measures, the promotion of normal birth, the detection of complications in mother and child, accessing of medical or other appropriate assistance and the carrying out of emergency measures.
Types Prenatal, Childbirth and Postpartum Doulas. Certified nurse midwife (CNM), certified professional midwife (CPM), direct-entry midwife (DEM), registered midwife (RM), licensed midwife (LM), depending on availability of state licensure for non-nurse midwives.
Etymology Ancient Greek doulē, meaning female who helps Middle English Mid meaning with & Old English wif meaning woman.
Certification Childbirth International, D.O.N.A (Doulas of North America), and C.A.P.P.A. In Canada: C.A.R.E. (Canadian Association Registry and education) North American Registry of Midwives & American College of Nurse Midwives. In Canada: Registered by the College of Alberta Midvives (AAM) and Canadian Association of MIdwives (CAM)
Salary $300 to $1000 per pregnancy they assisted mother in, depending on factors like cost of living, employer, credentials, experience. $40, 000 – $90, 000 as a base salary respect to change according to the employer, education, experience of the midwife etc.

Types & Duties

A doula can characteristically be classified into three types: prenatal doula,childbirth doula and postpartum doula. Based on the qualification, a doula may assist a pregnant woman before child birth by getting her necessary commodities and preparing her to deliver a baby. A childbirth doula, does just that, i.e. helps a pregnant woman deliver a baby. Her role may include assisting the mother during childbirth by supporting her emotionally etc. However, a postpartum doula can help a mother after child birth with all the essential chores at home, including but not limited to cooking, caring for the child, assisting in breast feeding etc.

Typically, there are two types of midwives: Direct-entry midwives, who usually enter directly into midwifery education programs without a prior professional credential and Certified nurse-midwives who are registered nurses before entering midwifery training. A midwife’s duties include helping child bearing women during labor, childbirth and providing postpartum care until the baby is six weeks old.

Etymology

The word Doula is derived from the Ancient Greek word doulē, meaning female slave.

The term Midwife is derived from Middle English word mid meaning with an Old English word wif meaning woman.

Salary

An experienced doula can earn anywhere from $300 to $1000 a time in the United States of America. These rates are flexible and usually depend on the cost of living of the area where the service is being delivered.

A midwife however, can make up to $40,000 – $90,000 a year in the United States of America. The amount mentioned is the base pay and can differ based on your employer, industry, credentials, experience etc.

Certification

Though it isn’t essential for a doula to be certified by an agency or an institution, many women prefer their doulas to meet some basic requirements. These requirements can be fulfilled from various doula certifying agencies across the country or even by appearing for exams over the internet. Doulas need to attend specific number of births before they can be certified, which varies from agency to agency. A few agencies in the United States are : Childbirth International and Doulas of North America.

Midwives can be certified through North American Registry of Midwives for Certified Professional Midwife, American College of Nurse Midwives for Certified Nurse-Midwife.

References

What is a Doula vs. Midwife

Tanya_Midwife_Doula_Hubby

[Article below is from   http://www.diffen.com/difference/Doula_vs_Midwife }

Childbirth today has several alternatives to the standard hospital experience with an obstetrician, and doula and midwife are just two of many.

A doula is an assistant who provides physical as well as emotional support during childbirth. She helps women in a non-medical capacity.

A midwife is a qualified professional from an institution of her country, which enables her to help a pregnant woman in delivering a baby. The World Health Organization defines a midwife as: A person who, having been regularly admitted to a midwifery educational program that is duly recognized in the country in which it is located, has successfully completed the prescribed course of studies in midwifery and has acquired the requisite qualifications to be registered and/or legally licensed to practice midwifery. The educational program may be an apprenticeship, a formal university program, or a combination.

Comparison chart

Doula versus Midwife comparison chart
  Doula Midwife
Definition A doula is an assistant who provides physical as well as emotional support during childbirth. She helps women in a non-medical capacity. A midwife is a qualified professional from an institution of her country, which enables her to help a pregnant woman in delivering a baby.
Duties Prenatal Doula aids with Educating women about their own choices regarding options for their upcoming birth of their child. Childbirth Doula helps the mother during labor and childbirth. Postpartum Doula offers services after the child is born Aids with preventive measures, the promotion of normal birth, the detection of complications in mother and child, accessing of medical or other appropriate assistance and the carrying out of emergency measures.
Types Prenatal, Childbirth and Postpartum Doulas. Certified nurse midwife (CNM), certified professional midwife (CPM), direct-entry midwife (DEM), registered midwife (RM), licensed midwife (LM), depending on availability of state licensure for non-nurse midwives.
Etymology Ancient Greek doulē, meaning female who helps Middle English Mid meaning with & Old English wif meaning woman.
Certification Childbirth International, D.O.N.A (Doulas of North America), and C.A.P.P.A. In Canada: C.A.R.E. (Canadian Association Registry and education) North American Registry of Midwives & American College of Nurse Midwives. In Canada: Registered by the College of Alberta Midvives (AAM) and Canadian Association of MIdwives (CAM)
Salary $300 to $1000 per pregnancy they assisted mother in, depending on factors like cost of living, employer, credentials, experience. $40, 000 – $90, 000 as a base salary respect to change according to the employer, education, experience of the midwife etc.

Types & Duties

A doula can characteristically be classified into three types: prenatal doula,childbirth doula and postpartum doula. Based on the qualification, a doula may assist a pregnant woman before child birth by getting her necessary commodities and preparing her to deliver a baby. A childbirth doula, does just that, i.e. helps a pregnant woman deliver a baby. Her role may include assisting the mother during childbirth by supporting her emotionally etc. However, a postpartum doula can help a mother after child birth with all the essential chores at home, including but not limited to cooking, caring for the child, assisting in breast feeding etc.

Typically, there are two types of midwives: Direct-entry midwives, who usually enter directly into midwifery education programs without a prior professional credential and Certified nurse-midwives who are registered nurses before entering midwifery training. A midwife’s duties include helping child bearing women during labor, childbirth and providing postpartum care until the baby is six weeks old.

Etymology

The word Doula is derived from the Ancient Greek word doulē, meaning female slave.

The term Midwife is derived from Middle English word mid meaning with an Old English word wif meaning woman.

Salary

An experienced doula can earn anywhere from $300 to $1000 a time in the United States of America. These rates are flexible and usually depend on the cost of living of the area where the service is being delivered.

A midwife however, can make up to $40,000 – $90,000 a year in the United States of America. The amount mentioned is the base pay and can differ based on your employer, industry, credentials, experience etc.

Certification

Though it isn’t essential for a doula to be certified by an agency or an institution, many women prefer their doulas to meet some basic requirements. These requirements can be fulfilled from various doula certifying agencies across the country or even by appearing for exams over the internet. Doulas need to attend specific number of births before they can be certified, which varies from agency to agency. A few agencies in the United States are : Childbirth International and Doulas of North America.

Midwives can be certified through North American Registry of Midwives for Certified Professional Midwife, American College of Nurse Midwives for Certified Nurse-Midwife.

References

What is a Doula vs. Midwife

[Article below is from   http://www.diffen.com/difference/Doula_vs_Midwife }

Childbirth today has several alternatives to the standard hospital experience with an obstetrician, and doula and midwife are just two of many.

A doula is an assistant who provides physical as well as emotional support during childbirth. She helps women in a non-medical capacity.

A midwife is a qualified professional from an institution of her country, which enables her to help a pregnant woman in delivering a baby. The World Health Organization defines a midwife as: A person who, having been regularly admitted to a midwifery educational program that is duly recognized in the country in which it is located, has successfully completed the prescribed course of studies in midwifery and has acquired the requisite qualifications to be registered and/or legally licensed to practice midwifery. The educational program may be an apprenticeship, a formal university program, or a combination.

Comparison chart

Doula versus Midwife comparison chart
  Doula Midwife
Definition A doula is an assistant who provides physical as well as emotional support during childbirth. She helps women in a non-medical capacity. A midwife is a qualified professional from an institution of her country, which enables her to help a pregnant woman in delivering a baby.
Duties Prenatal Doula aids with Educating women about their own choices regarding options for their upcoming birth of their child. Childbirth Doula helps the mother during labor and childbirth. Postpartum Doula offers services after the child is born Aids with preventive measures, the promotion of normal birth, the detection of complications in mother and child, accessing of medical or other appropriate assistance and the carrying out of emergency measures.
Types Prenatal, Childbirth and Postpartum Doulas. Certified nurse midwife (CNM), certified professional midwife (CPM), direct-entry midwife (DEM), registered midwife (RM), licensed midwife (LM), depending on availability of state licensure for non-nurse midwives.
Etymology Ancient Greek doulē, meaning female who helps Middle English Mid meaning with & Old English wif meaning woman.
Certification Childbirth International, D.O.N.A (Doulas of North America), and C.A.P.P.A. In Canada: C.A.R.E. (Canadian Association Registry and education) North American Registry of Midwives & American College of Nurse Midwives. In Canada: Registered by the College of Alberta Midvives (AAM) and Canadian Association of MIdwives (CAM)
Salary $300 to $1000 per pregnancy they assisted mother in, depending on factors like cost of living, employer, credentials, experience. $40, 000 – $90, 000 as a base salary respect to change according to the employer, education, experience of the midwife etc.

Types & Duties

A doula can characteristically be classified into three types: prenatal doula, childbirth doula and postpartum doula. Based on the qualification, a doula may assist a pregnant woman before child birth by getting her necessary commodities and preparing her to deliver a baby. A childbirth doula, does just that, i.e. helps a pregnant woman deliver a baby. Her role may include assisting the mother during childbirth by supporting her emotionally etc. However, a postpartum doula can help a mother after child birth with all the essential chores at home, including but not limited to cooking, caring for the child, assisting in breast feeding etc.

Typically, there are two types of midwives: Direct-entry midwives, who usually enter directly into midwifery education programs without a prior professional credential and Certified nurse-midwives who are registered nurses before entering midwifery training. A midwife’s duties include helping child bearing women during labor, childbirth and providing postpartum care until the baby is six weeks old.

Etymology

The word Doula is derived from the Ancient Greek word doulē, meaning female slave.

The term Midwife is derived from Middle English word mid meaning with an Old English word wif meaning woman.

Salary

An experienced doula can earn anywhere from $300 to $1000 a time in the United States of America. These rates are flexible and usually depend on the cost of living of the area where the service is being delivered.

A midwife however, can make up to $40,000 – $90,000 a year in the United States of America. The amount mentioned is the base pay and can differ based on your employer, industry, credentials, experience etc.

Certification

Though it isn’t essential for a doula to be certified by an agency or an institution, many women prefer their doulas to meet some basic requirements. These requirements can be fulfilled from various doula certifying agencies across the country or even by appearing for exams over the internet. Doulas need to attend specific number of births before they can be certified, which varies from agency to agency. A few agencies in the United States are : Childbirth International and Doulas of North America.

Midwives can be certified through North American Registry of Midwives for Certified Professional Midwife, American College of Nurse Midwives for Certified Nurse-Midwife.

References