Advice for Mother at the time of Birth ~Spiritual Midwifery

“At a birthing, the mother is the main channel of life force. If she is cooperative and selfless and brave, it makes there be more energy for everyone, including her baby who is getting born. Giving somebody some makes you and everyone else feel good. You don’t have your baby out yet to cuddle and hold; so giving the midwives and your husband some is giving your baby some. If you are in a hospital, you can make there be more energy by finding someone you can connect and be friends with.

During a rush, keep your eyes open, and keep paying attention to those around you and to what’s happening. If you feel afraid or if something is happening that makes you uptight, report it—the midwives can help sort it out until it feels good.

Don’t complain, it makes things worse. If you usually complain, practice not doing it during pregnancy. It will build character.

Talk nice; it will keep your bottom loose so it can open up easier. It’s okay to ask the midwives or your husband to do something for you, like rub your legs or get a glass of water. Ask real nice and give folks “folks some when they do something for you.

Be grateful that you’re having a baby, and be grateful to your partner who’s helping you—it’s an experience that you only do a few times in your life, so make the very most of it, and get your head in a place where you can get as high as possible.

Remember you have a real, live baby in there. Sometimes it’s such an intense trip having a baby that you can forget what it’s for!

Learn how to relax—it’s something that requires attention. You may have to put out some effort to gather your attention together enough that you can relax.

Keep your sense of humor—it’s a priceless gem which keeps you remembering where it’s at. If you can’t be a hero, you can at least be funny while being a chicken.

Remember your monkey self knows how to do this really well. Your brain isn’t very reliable as a guide of how to be during childbirth, but your monkey self is.”

Excerpt From: Ina May Gaskin. “Spiritual Midwifery.” Book Publishing Company. iBooks.

Check out this book on the iBooks Store: https://itun.es/us/JjV4x.l

Doctor in Queens, NY Delivers Breech Babies!

Great news from the community of Birth workers in New York that has many of us shouting for joy and some of us just glad the news is out.

As a student of midwifery I have learned enough about breech deliveries to know that delivering babies breech is very possible when educated in the proper techniques. It is all to normal for me to be shocked upon hearing news that an obstetrician in a hospital has delivered healthy babies who’ve been in a breech position.

My path to midwifery is leading me up a road led by ground shaking, standard setting, statistic proving, midwives known to be the Farm Midwives of Summertown, Tennessee who have pioneered modern day midwifery and gained the respect back for the ancient practice. My education with these wonderful woman has allowed me to learn about the different techniques that are used to delivery breech babies. These techniques are not generally taught in Universities anymore to students of Maternal-Fetal Medicine & Obstetrics & Gynecology. Reasons such as this is why many women are opting to study the ancient craft of midwifery to gain the hands on experience as well as the educational portion of the practice instead of just going to a University and only learning everything from a text.

I am grateful to have wonderful teachers that prepare me for a career of unexpected events that will allow me to save lives and empower a mum through her labor.

With the sketchy laws in NYC still tippy toeing around midwifery being illegal depending on what certification the Professional has. It is good to know that mums who op’t for hospital births can trust that some OBGYNs are prepared for the unexpected at birth without having to consider unnecessary interventions.

 

For Mum’s expecting and or possibly having a breech delivery, here is the Dr. you should know about…
Dr Georges Sylvestre at Flushing Hospital.
He accepts all insurance including Medicaid.
He accepts a transfer of care at 38 weeks.

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Midwifery Myths Set Straight by ourmomentoftruth.com

The profession of midwifery has evolved with today’s modern health care system. But there are many myths about midwives in the United States based on centuries-old images or simple misunderstandings. You might be surprised to learn the truth about some of these common midwifery myths.

 

True or False?

Midwives have no formal education.

FALSE. Most midwives in the United States have a master’s degree and are required to pass a national certification exam. There are many different types of midwives, each holding different certifications based on their education and/or experience. Certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) and certified midwives (CMs) attend approximately 93% of all midwife-attended births in the United States, and as of 2010 they are required to have a master’s degree in order to practice midwifery.

Midwives and physicians work together.

TRUE. CNMs and CMs work with all members of the health care team, including physicians. Midwifery care fits well with the services provided by obstetrician/gynecologists (OB/GYNs), who are experts in high risk, medical complications, and surgery. By working with OB/GYNs, midwives can ensure that a specialist is available if a high-risk condition should arise. Likewise, many OB/GYN practices include midwives who specialize in care for women through normal, healthy life events. In this way, all women can receive the right care for their individual health care needs.

Midwives only focus on pregnancy and birth.

FALSE. Midwives have expert knowledge and skill in caring for women through pregnancy, birth, and the postpartum period. But they also do much more. CNMs and CMs provide health care services to women in all stages of life, from the teenage years through menopause, including general health check-ups, screenings and vaccinations; pregnancy, birth, and postpartum care; well woman gynecologic care; treatment of sexually transmitted infections; and prescribing medications, including all forms of pain control medications and birth control.

Midwives can prescribe medications and order tests.

TRUE. CNMs and CMs are licensed to prescribe a full range of substances, medications, and treatments, including pain control medications and birth control. They can also order needed medical tests within their scope of practice and consistent with state laws and practice guidelines.

Midwives cannot care for me if I have a chronic health condition or my pregnancy is considered high-risk.

FALSE. Midwives are able to provide different levels of care depending on a woman’s individual health needs. If you have a chronic health condition, a midwife still may be able to provide some or all of your direct care services. In other cases, a midwife may play a more of a supportive role and help you work with other health care providers to address your personal health care challenges. In a high-risk pregnancy, a midwife can help you access resources to support your goals for childbirth, provide emotional support during challenging times, or work alongside specialists who are experts in your high-risk condition to ensure safe, healthy outcomes.

Midwives offer pain relief to women during labor.

TRUE. Midwives are leading experts in how to cope with labor pain. As a partner with you in your health care, your midwife will explain pain relief options and help you develop a birth plan that best fits your personal needs and desires. Whether you wish to use methods such as relaxation techniques or movement during labor or try IV, epidural, or other medications, your midwife will work with you to help meet your desired approach to birth. At the same time, your midwife will provide you with information and resources about the different options and choices available if any changes to your birth plan become necessary or if you change your mind.

Midwives only attend births at home.

FALSE. Midwives practice in many different settings, including hospitals, medical offices, free-standing birth centers, clinics, and/or private settings (such as your home). In fact, because many women who choose a midwife for their care wish to deliver their babies in a hospital, many hospitals in the United States offer an in-house midwifery service. And because midwives are dedicated to one-on-one care, many practice in more than one setting to help ensure that women have access to the range of services they need or desire and to allow for specific health considerations. In 2012, about 95% of births attended by midwives in the United States were in hospitals.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15YAObX_lrM#action=share