Birth Statistics ~ The need for more Midwives

Demetra Seriki is a NARM registered Midwife and owner of A Mother’s Choice – Birth Options and Beyond

She is also a Midwife who serves the community of Colorado Springs, Colorado and is currently seeking Student midwives of Color who are interested in training to complete their education as midwives. With so many hospitals closing in many states across the country, the necessity for properly trained Midwives are seemingly increasing.

She recently shared some disturbing but much needed statistics about birth:

 

It is with a very HEAVY heart that I will report the 2016 birth statistics in El Paso County (Colorado Springs) for families of color. They do not separate the stats by birth location so these numbers represent total births and all birth locations.

Total births (all races) 9,499
1. Hispanic – 1,517
2. Black – 814
3. Asian – 468
4. Native – 92

Low Birth Weight (<2,500):
1. Hispanic – 8.8
2. Black – 14.1
3. Asian – 9.0
4. Native – 13.0

Very Low Birth Weight (<1,500)
1. Hispanic – 1.5
2. Black – 2.5
3. Asian -0.9
4. Native – 6.5

Preterm
1. Hispanic – 10.4
2. Black – 13.5
3. Asian – 9.8
4. Native – 19.6

52 infant deaths
34 neonatal deaths

Unfortunately the data that I can see does not identify these babies (angles babies) by race. (I can’t imagine why)

 

If you are a student midwife or a women seeking health services in the Colorado Springs, Colorado area please feel free to contact her.

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Taji Mag|YtheDoula introduces the IbiOp App for Birth Options & OBGyn

ibiopFinally an app that lists all Doulas, Midwives, OB-GYNs and more of Color: the IbiOp app. Yasmintheresa Garcia is 24 year old Afro-Dominican from East New York, Brooklyn. This Midwife in training, Doula, and Childbirth educator is recently the creator and developer of the IbiOp App.

Yasmintheresa recalls practicing being a Doula when she was 12 years old, before she even know it was a career. She began to focus on her career as a Doula to gain experience to become a midwife 3 years ago after watching the “Business of being born” documentary.

What made her interested in this field of expertise was the want to make women feel empowered by supporting them during the moment when they become super humans but may also feel the most vulnerable.

ibiopDuring her extensive research to find a Midwife to be her preceptor as Midwife in training, she realized the lack of accessibility there is to different medical providers. Many Midwives who have their own private practice don’t have time to update their facebook page or twitter let alone have a website. Roughly only 27 states allow Certified Professional Midwives to have their own practice outside of hospital institutions, therefore she made it her mission after training with the Farm Midwives of Summertown, TN to create a directory where not only clients can find these birth workers who specialize in natural birth, but students interested in the field also.

Since her freshmen year in college, Yasmintheresa knew that as a millennial she would have to create something in the tech world or else regret not using her knowledge of advance technology that she acquired while growing up. She came up with the idea in January of 2016 when she created a virtual vision board for the spring season and added a photo of the app store logo to remind herself everyday to research and create an app to serve the industry she works in. After intensive research and creative surges she drew up her app, gathered data, and began to work on hers. Yasmintheresa wants people to know that not all millennials are lazy. That even though she has had many doors closed in her face, she still manages to create what she wished existed, including her own opportunities.

IbiOp was created to allow women all over the world access to health care focusing on gynecology. With the IbiOp app, women can now access a directory of medical providers or labor and birth support persons anywhere in the world. This app will allow women who travel the touch of a button access to options available in their community for gynecology services or antenatal, prenatal, and postnatal support.

Women who are expecting or just concerned with their health will now have an app where they can find anything from a Midwife who does regular check ups and all well women care, to OB-GYNs who focus on high risk patients, or expecting mothers who are simply looking for labor and birth support from Doulas. The app also includes events happening worldwide that focus on women’s health, expectant mothers, and family planning.

Their goal with IbiOp is to have as many options for women to choose from when selecting a labor support person or medical provider. IbiOp will benefit every woman who has access to apps worldwide. Now an 18 year old in college who just had her first experience with a guy and wants to get checked but is to shy to walk into a clinic can find someone on the app that looks like her and who she feels comfortable with. They have even considered the woman who is pregnant and travelling who needs to see a midwife for a sudden check up in a foreign country.

Yasmintheresa is an ambitious young woman thriving in an industry that was once known for having mainly elder midwives as birth attendants and gate keepers of life and death. Today the maternity industry has women of all ages catering to mothers across the board while jumping through loopholes and creating new rights for women to be able to birth freely. She works tirelessly to fund her own Midwifery education and career and hopes that others see the necessity in support for women of color.

IbiOp is now available for download in both Apple & Google app store for FREE.

The Willow Breast Pump

There is no question that best way to feed a newborn is to breastfeed. When a baby is born they constantly seek the comfort of mum because that is now their life force. Mum provides love, protection, nurture, and food of course!

Breast feeding is imperative for a babies’ development and creating the very important bond between mum and baby however many mums find themselves still in need of a comfortable breast pump to use while breastfeeding or when they have to be away from their babe.

Whether it is because you have to return back to work or school and want to insure your baby still feeds from your milk exclusively or if you are experiencing large amounts of milk being produced by your breast, you will need a comfortable, easy to use and to hide breast pump!

Well how about a breast pump that fits in your bra and no one even notices your pumping. Sounds PERFECT!

How about a breast pump that doesn’t hurt because it can fit any boob of any size?

Check out what I found. One of my new favorite products!

http://www.willowpump.com/

 

 

Article from    http://mashable.com/2017/01/05/willow-breast-pump/#YxMJmoLP8ZqY

“A new breast pump startup wants to help new moms take a literal hands-off approach to pumping. 

Willow is a set of two breast pump wearables that are meant to be worn inside a woman’s bra. An app on the wearer’s smartphone tracks volume of breast milk and time spent pumping and logs that date for later use. 

Women don’t need the app to pump, however– the product works entirely on its own to encourage the let-down reflex and then adjusts pumping based on the wearer’s flow. When the bag is full, the pump stops automatically. One charge gets wearers at least five pumping sessions, and in a pinch, can do a single session on 20 minutes of charging.

The idea behind Willow is to allow women to pump while still going about daily activities. But is it discreet enough to be worn out of the house?

Willow Co-founder and CTO John Chang tells Mashable that women who’ve tested the pump can testify that it’s quiet enough for public use. 

“Moms have come back to us and, instead of having to hit the mute button on a conference call, they’re having a conference call and nobody knows that they’re pumping,” he said. Indeed, the pump made little noise as we spoke at Willow’s International CES booth.

Chang admitted that because of their larger size, users have said that spouses and coworkers can tell when they’re wearing the pumps. Strangers, however, don’t seem to take notice. 

“What we’re hoping is that this is transformative for moms, so that they don’t have to stop or pause their life. They can plug into life, not plug into the wall,” Chang said.

 

SO JUST A HEADS UP AS SOON AS IT HITS THE MARKET! I’LL BE SHARING THE NEWS!

 

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THINGS TO REMEMBER:::

How breastfeeding BENEFITS BABY

  • Breastfeeding protects your baby from a long list of illnesses
  • Breastfeeding can protect your baby from developing allergies
  • Breastfeeding may boost your child’s intelligence
  • Breastfeeding may protect your child from obesity
  • Breastfeeding may lower your baby’s risk of SIDS
  • Breastfeeding can reduce your stress level and your risk of postpartum depression
  • Breastfeeding may reduce your risk of some types of cancer

 

How Breastfeeding BENEFITS MOTHER

  • Breastfeeding burns extra calories, so it can help you lose pregnancy weight faster.
  • Releases the hormone oxytocin, which helps your uterus return to its pre-pregnancy size and reduce uterine bleeding after birth
  • Lowers mother’s risk of breast and ovarian cancer
  • May lower risk of osteoporosis

 

*For breastfeeding support and education click for Doula services*

 

 

 

 

15 Financial Must-Dos to Prepare for a New Baby by Elizabeth Renter September 19, 2016

Preparing for parenthood isn’t just tiny clothes and heartwarming ultrasound photos; it involves a lot of financial preparation. This guide will lay out the most important financial tasks on your plate from pregnancy to baby’s first years, including:

  • Estimating your medical costs
  • Planning leave from your job
  • Budgeting for the new arrival

Some parenting preparations are best learned on the fly — how to effortlessly and painlessly change the messiest diapers, for instance. But the list of things to do before baby arrives and within his or her first several weeks is lengthy, so tackling certain tasks now is a smart idea.

Pre-delivery planning

1. Understand your health insurance and anticipate costs. Having a baby is expensive, even when you have health insurance. You should forecast your expected costs fairly early in the pregnancy. NerdWallet’s guide to making sense of your medical bills can help as you navigate prenatal care, labor and delivery, and the bills that will ultimately follow.

2. Plan for maternity/paternity leave. How much time you and your partner (if you have one) get off work and whether you’re paid during that period can significantly impact your household finances in the coming year. Understand your company’s policies and your state’s laws to get an accurate picture of how your maternity leave will affect your bottom line.

3. Draft your pre-baby budget. Once you know what you’ll be spending on out-of-pocket medical costs, understand how your income will be impacted in the coming months and have prepared a shopping list for your new addition, adjust your budget accordingly. Babies come with plenty of expenses, so set a limit on both necessary and optional buys (like that designer diaper bag or high-end stroller with the LCD control panel), and consider buying used to keep spending under control.

4. Plan your post-delivery budget. Recurring costs such as diapers, child care and extra food will change your household expenses for years to come. Plan for them now so you aren’t caught off guard.

5. Choose a pediatrician within your insurance network. Your baby’s first doctor appointment will come within her first week of life, so you’ll want to have a physician picked out. Talk to friends and family to get recommendations, call around to local clinics and ask to interview a pediatrician before you make your choice. In searching for the right doctor, don’t forget to double-check that he or she is within your insurance network. Ask the clinic, but verify by calling your insurance company so you’re not hit with unexpected out-of-network charges.

6. Start or check your emergency fund. If you don’t already have a “rainy day fund,” now’s the time to anticipate some emergencies. Kids are accident prone, and with the cost of raising a child there’s no telling if you’ll have the disposable income to pay for any unexpected expenses. Having at least three to six months’ worth of living expenses covered is a great place to start.

While in the hospital

The main focus while you’re in the hospital is having a healthy baby. But there are a few loose ends that will need to be taken care of.

7. Order a birth certificate and Social Security card. Hospital staffers should provide you with the necessary paperwork to get your new child’s Social Security number and birth certificate. If they don’t or if you are having a home birth, contact your state’s office of vital records for the birth certificate and your local Social Security office to get a Social Security card.

Within baby’s first 30 days

8. Add your child to your health insurance. In most cases, you have 30 days from your child’s birth date to add him to an existing health insurance policy. In some employer-based plans, you have 60 days. Regardless, do it sooner rather than later, as you don’t want to be caught with a sick baby and no coverage.

9. Consider a life insurance policy on your child. No one expects the tragedy of losing a child, so many parents don’t plan for it. The rates are generally low because a child’s life insurance policy is used to cover funeral costs and little else. When it comes to covering children, a “term” policy that lasts until they are self-sufficient is the most popular choice.

10. Begin planning for child care. Finding the right day care or nanny can take weeks. Get started long before your maternity leave is over. You’ll need time to visit day care centers or interview nannies, as well as complete an application and approval process if required.

Beyond the first month

You’ll be in this parenting role for years to come, so planning for the future is crucial. Estate planning is a big part of providing for your children, but it isn’t the only important forward-focused task to check off your list.

11. Adjust your beneficiaries. Assuming you already have life insurance for yourself or the main breadwinner in your household — and if you don’t, you should — you may want to add your child as a beneficiary. The same goes for your 401(k) and IRAs. However, keep in mind that you’ll need to make adjustments elsewhere to ensure when and how your child will have access to the money. A will and/or trust can accomplish this.

12. Disability insurance. You’re far more likely to need disability insurance than life insurance. Make sure you have the right amount of coverage — enough to meet your expenses if you’re out of work for several months. Remember, your monthly living expenses have gone up since the new addition.

13. Write or adjust your will. Tragic things happen and you want to ensure your child is taken care of in the event that one or both parents die. Designate a guardian so the courts don’t have to. Your will is only one part of estate planning, but it’s a good place to begin.

14. Keep funding your retirement. When a child arrives, it’s easy to forget your personal goals and long-term plans in light of this huge responsibility. Stay on top of your retirement plans so your child doesn’t have to support you in old age.

15. Save for his or her education. College is costly, but you can make it more manageable by starting to save early.

Adding a new member to your family comes with a lengthy list of responsibilities, so don’t try to do them all at once. Prioritize and tackle the most important items on your financial to-do list first. Because medical bills and insurance claims will be some of the first financial obligations you’ll encounter while expecting, start there. Move on to budgeting for pregnancy and the first several months of your baby’s life.

With 18 or more years until your little one leaves home, time would seem to be on your side. But — as the saying goes — blink and he’s grown. Now is the time to start taking the steps that will set your family up for financial success.

Elizabeth Renter is a staff writer at NerdWallet, a personal finance website. Email: elizabeth@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @ElizabethRenter.

Midwifery Myths Set Straight by ourmomentoftruth.com

The profession of midwifery has evolved with today’s modern health care system. But there are many myths about midwives in the United States based on centuries-old images or simple misunderstandings. You might be surprised to learn the truth about some of these common midwifery myths.

 

True or False?

Midwives have no formal education.

FALSE. Most midwives in the United States have a master’s degree and are required to pass a national certification exam. There are many different types of midwives, each holding different certifications based on their education and/or experience. Certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) and certified midwives (CMs) attend approximately 93% of all midwife-attended births in the United States, and as of 2010 they are required to have a master’s degree in order to practice midwifery.

Midwives and physicians work together.

TRUE. CNMs and CMs work with all members of the health care team, including physicians. Midwifery care fits well with the services provided by obstetrician/gynecologists (OB/GYNs), who are experts in high risk, medical complications, and surgery. By working with OB/GYNs, midwives can ensure that a specialist is available if a high-risk condition should arise. Likewise, many OB/GYN practices include midwives who specialize in care for women through normal, healthy life events. In this way, all women can receive the right care for their individual health care needs.

Midwives only focus on pregnancy and birth.

FALSE. Midwives have expert knowledge and skill in caring for women through pregnancy, birth, and the postpartum period. But they also do much more. CNMs and CMs provide health care services to women in all stages of life, from the teenage years through menopause, including general health check-ups, screenings and vaccinations; pregnancy, birth, and postpartum care; well woman gynecologic care; treatment of sexually transmitted infections; and prescribing medications, including all forms of pain control medications and birth control.

Midwives can prescribe medications and order tests.

TRUE. CNMs and CMs are licensed to prescribe a full range of substances, medications, and treatments, including pain control medications and birth control. They can also order needed medical tests within their scope of practice and consistent with state laws and practice guidelines.

Midwives cannot care for me if I have a chronic health condition or my pregnancy is considered high-risk.

FALSE. Midwives are able to provide different levels of care depending on a woman’s individual health needs. If you have a chronic health condition, a midwife still may be able to provide some or all of your direct care services. In other cases, a midwife may play a more of a supportive role and help you work with other health care providers to address your personal health care challenges. In a high-risk pregnancy, a midwife can help you access resources to support your goals for childbirth, provide emotional support during challenging times, or work alongside specialists who are experts in your high-risk condition to ensure safe, healthy outcomes.

Midwives offer pain relief to women during labor.

TRUE. Midwives are leading experts in how to cope with labor pain. As a partner with you in your health care, your midwife will explain pain relief options and help you develop a birth plan that best fits your personal needs and desires. Whether you wish to use methods such as relaxation techniques or movement during labor or try IV, epidural, or other medications, your midwife will work with you to help meet your desired approach to birth. At the same time, your midwife will provide you with information and resources about the different options and choices available if any changes to your birth plan become necessary or if you change your mind.

Midwives only attend births at home.

FALSE. Midwives practice in many different settings, including hospitals, medical offices, free-standing birth centers, clinics, and/or private settings (such as your home). In fact, because many women who choose a midwife for their care wish to deliver their babies in a hospital, many hospitals in the United States offer an in-house midwifery service. And because midwives are dedicated to one-on-one care, many practice in more than one setting to help ensure that women have access to the range of services they need or desire and to allow for specific health considerations. In 2012, about 95% of births attended by midwives in the United States were in hospitals.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15YAObX_lrM#action=share

Knowing your Uterus – Retroverted Uterus P.1

Many women including myself have swayed through life not understanding why we suffer from health disparities. We often face issues like PCOS: Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, PMS, Fibroids, experience miscarriages, and infertility for years without understanding why and usually are told to treat the pain and discomfort with drugs rather than being educated about the cause of the syndrome and encouraged to create a lifestyle suited for our personal predispositions.

An exam may be necessary  

I was once lucky enough to have visited the most prestigious Emergency room I have ever been to. While living in Thomasville, NC when I started feeling lower abdominal pain in fear of it being cyst like I’ve had before, I was referred to an OB-GYN that was adequately trained. This OB was doing my follow up and wanted to thoroughly exam my pelvis to understand why I was having pain near my ovaries. After I mentioned having once suffered a horrific burst of an ovarian cyst that left me on bed rest for almost a month; She wanted to rule out all worst case scenarios. This doctor felt a sonogram was not sufficient therefore she went on to perform a vaginal sonogram on me. It was a bit nerve wrecking for me because I was not sexually active at the time but the information she provided me with during this exam made the whole examination worth it. My boyfriend at the time held my hand through the exam and made the experience less dreadful. This doctor proceeded to educate me about my uterus being retroverted.Image result for retroverted uterus

A retroverted uterus (tilted uterus, tipped uterus) is auterus that is tilted posteriorly. This is in contrast to the slightly “anteverted” uterus that most women have, which is tipped forward toward the bladder, with the anterior end slightly concave.

Symptoms of a retroverted uterus

Generally, a retroverted uterus does not cause any problems. If problems do occur, it will probably be because the woman has an associated disorder like endometriosis. A disorder like this could cause the following symptoms:

A range of causes for a retroverted uterus

Some of the causes of a retroverted uterus include:

Sexual problems

In most cases of retroverted uterus, the ovaries and fallopian tubes are tipped backwards too. This means that all of these structures can be ‘butted’ by the head of the penis during intercourse. This is known as ‘collision dyspareunia’. The woman-on-top position usually causes the most pain. It is possible for vigorous sex in this position to injure or tear the ligaments surrounding the uterus.

Fertility issues

It is thought that a retroverted uterus has no bearing on a woman’s fertility.

Retroverted uterus and pregnancy

In most cases, a retroverted uterus doesn’t interfere with pregnancy. After the first trimester, the expanding uterus lifts out of the pelvis and, for the remainder of the pregnancy, assumes the typical forward-tipped position.

In a small percentage of cases, the growing uterus is ‘snagged’ on pelvic bone (usually the sacrum). This condition is known as ‘incarcerated uterus’. The symptoms usually occur somewhere between weeks 12 and 14, and can include pain and difficulties passing urine.

Things to remember

Since learning about being with a retroverted uterus I realized how my physiology differed from other women. 1 in 6 women are born with a retroverted uterus. Some may live their wholes lives not knowing unless they inquire to find out or they experience some of the disparities I was dealt. Some of the causes are, painful sex, yeast infections due to high levels of acid in your ph., and painful periods. Some women learn about having this, way into their pregnancy and if their lucky enough they will have a Doula, who will instruct them on how to minimize the nausea episodes and perhaps provide some insight on why it is detrimental to eat the right foods for a more comfortable and easy going pregnancy.

It is very important to understand that our body parts are not separated. We often lose sight of the truth being that everything is connected and in tuned especially when we are not in tuned with our own bodies. We often pop a pill an ignore aches and pains when it can very well be our body telling us to pay attention BEFORE something goes wrong. I was grateful to have learned about my beautifully unique uterus because I was able to change my diet and life style in order to prevent things like fibroids, endometriosis, PMS and more. I learned early that my diet effects my PH-balance and if my PH (hormones) are off then my body becomes a home for disease and ailments especially when I am already sensitive because of the way I was created.

Before we continue our lives not knowing how magical and intricate our bodies are I hope we can all become a bit more curious about our Uterus’ and how different they can all be. Perhaps now we can tend to our personal needs as women and not be shocked when sudden issues begin to effect our health during our child bearing years.

The good news is that in most cases it is possible to have a baby if you have one of these uterine abnormalities:
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Uterus didelphys
This is an uncommon abnormality where the uterus has two inner cavities. Each cavity may lead to its own cervix and vagina. This means there are two cervixes and two vaginas. It affects about one in 350 women.

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Unicornuate uterus 

A unicornuate uterus is half the size of a normal uterus and there is only one fallopian tube. Because of its shape, it is described as a uterus with one horn. It is a rare abnormality, affecting about one in 1,000 women. It develops in the earliest stages of life, when the tissue that forms the uterus does not grow properly. If you have a unicornuate uterus, you probably have two ovaries but only one will be connected to your uterus.
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Bicornuate uterus
Instead of being pear-shaped, this type of uterus looks more like a heart, with a deep indentation at the top. It is called a uterus with two horns, because of its shape. It’s thought that fewer than one woman in 200 women has a bicornuate uterus.

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Septate uterus

This is where the inside of the uterus is divided by a muscular or fibrous wall, called the septum. About one woman in 45 women is affected. The septum may extend only part way into the uterus (partial septate uterus) or it may reach as far as the cervix (complete septate uterus). Partial or subseptates are more common than complete septates. A septate uterus may make it more difficult for you to conceive.

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Arcuate uterus
This looks more like a normal uterus, except it has a dip, or slight indentation at the top. It is a common abnormality, affecting about a quarter of women.

About one in six women have a uterus that tilts backwards toward the spine (retroverted uterus). This is not an abnormality. It won’t affect how your baby grows, although it may mean your bump starts to show later than for other women.

http://www.babycentre.co.uk/a551934/abnormalities-of-the-uterus-in-pregnancy#ixzz3yO1RFZ9i