Give the Gift of a Doula

Do you know an expectant mother who deserves the service of a Doula?

or

Are your friends or family planning a baby shower for you?

Consider having them all chip in for a gift certificate for doula services.

This thoughtful gift will help you and your partner have a more satisfying, memorable and joyful birth experience.

YtheDoula now offers Gift certificates for services including Prenatal & postnatal Doula, Sex education for females of all ages, Childbirth Education, massage therapy, and health coaching.

Breakdown of services offered: 

Birth Doula: The word “doula” comes from the ancient Greek meaning “a woman who serves” and is now used to refer to a trained and experienced professional who provides continuous physical, emotional and informational support to the mother before, during and just after birth; or who provides emotional and practical support during the postpartum period.

Postnatal Doula: A postpartum doula provides evidenced based information on things such as infant feeding, emotional and physical recovery from birth, mother–baby bonding, infant soothing, and basic newborn care. A postpartum doula is there to help a new family in those first days and weeks after bringing home a new baby.

Sex education:  Instruction on issues relating to human sexuality, including emotional, spiritual relations and responsibilities, human sexual anatomy, sexual activity, sexual reproduction, reproductive health, reproductive rights, safe sex, birth control (family planning).

Childbirth Education: class is a great way to prepare for labor and birth. Depending on where you go, classes range from a one-day intensive workshop to weekly sessions lasting a month or more. The typical class consists of lectures, discussions, and exercises, all led by a trained childbirth instructor.

Massage therapy: Is manual manipulation of soft body tissues (muscle, connective tissue, tendons and ligaments) to enhance a person’s health and well-being. *Acupressure inclusive*

Health Coaching: *Emphasis on Vegan health* A wellness authority and supportive mentor who motivates individuals to cultivate positive health choices. Health Coaches educate and support clients to achieve their health goals through lifestyle and behavior adjustments.

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Meant to be a Doula

Meant to be a Doula

It is no surprise to me that I have ended up here as a protégé of midwifery services. At the age of 14 was when my obsession with the miraculous act of child birth began. I remember watching everything that had to do with child birth on the te-lie-vision (tv) and doing independent research on how my body will one day experience the magic itself. Then was when my journey to becoming a sexual reproduction educator and doula began. I do also recall being a very eager 12 year old wanting to know exactly what was happening to my body the moment I got my first period. Yes, I was that person who googled everything and joined the mailing list on those tween websites to receive free tampons and pads. They also gave cool diagrams and coloring books to know exactly how your uterus functioned! Who wouldn’t want that as keep sake?

Habits create a life style…

Oddly enough I can remember my first science project for my freshman year science fair. My project was based on the reproduction cycles of both men and woman which was followed by a presentation of both female and male contraceptives. How ironic, I know. Today I don’t believe in contraceptives. I have learned there are many different forms of contraceptives that don’t come out of a box. We’ll get to that later.  I was pretty pretentious to go out in front of the whole school, try and teach everyone about sex and contraceptives while being a virgin. I guess you can really say those who don’t do, teach.

Welcoming womanhood…

Now through the coming of a woman journey that I have experienced throughout the few decades of living on this earth, I have finally realized what truly made me happy to wake up each morning and motivated me to live each day. It was the reality of life being born around us every second. Within finding myself as a woman through mile stones, hardships and exploring the greatness in my sexuality I had made a decision to be a part of the Welcoming life Crew. (WLC includes, OBGs, Midwives, Doulas, Nurses, Witch Doctors) whatever you shall call them if they deliver or assist in delivering new life they are a part of that crew that I just made up, Welcoming Life Crew.

Being Proactic

Destiny is not a matter of chance, but of choice. Not something to wish for, but to attain.                          – William Jennings Bryan

A few months ago when I looked at my life and what I was doing; I realized I wasn’t fulfilling something inside of me. I worked for the 9th biggest company in this country and I felt as if I was dying inside. One day after watching a documentary by Rikki Lake and Abby Epstein, “The Business of Being Born”. I instantly knew why I was so passionate about birth and “Welcoming Life” into this world. >>What went through my mind was, Every time a new life is born into this world is another message being told to us by the Universe, by God, by a Higher Power that it hasn’t given up on us. In that moment I knew that I wanted to be a part of that message. I want to be the advocate of New Life being born into this world with a chance of a better tomorrow or at least a better today. This is why I am on my journey to being a DONA certified Doula with emphasis on natural birth because I was born to serve my people, my sisters and empower them to do what they biologically were born to do.  ~YtheG

What is a Doula vs. Midwife

Tanya_Midwife_Doula_Hubby

[Article below is from   http://www.diffen.com/difference/Doula_vs_Midwife }

Childbirth today has several alternatives to the standard hospital experience with an obstetrician, and doula and midwife are just two of many.

A doula is an assistant who provides physical as well as emotional support during childbirth. She helps women in a non-medical capacity.

A midwife is a qualified professional from an institution of her country, which enables her to help a pregnant woman in delivering a baby. The World Health Organization defines a midwife as: A person who, having been regularly admitted to a midwifery educational program that is duly recognized in the country in which it is located, has successfully completed the prescribed course of studies in midwifery and has acquired the requisite qualifications to be registered and/or legally licensed to practice midwifery. The educational program may be an apprenticeship, a formal university program, or a combination.

Comparison chart

Doula versus Midwife comparison chart
  Doula Midwife
Definition A doula is an assistant who provides physical as well as emotional support during childbirth. She helps women in a non-medical capacity. A midwife is a qualified professional from an institution of her country, which enables her to help a pregnant woman in delivering a baby.
Duties Prenatal Doula aids with Educating women about their own choices regarding options for their upcoming birth of their child. Childbirth Doula helps the mother during labor and childbirth. Postpartum Doula offers services after the child is born Aids with preventive measures, the promotion of normal birth, the detection of complications in mother and child, accessing of medical or other appropriate assistance and the carrying out of emergency measures.
Types Prenatal, Childbirth and Postpartum Doulas. Certified nurse midwife (CNM), certified professional midwife (CPM), direct-entry midwife (DEM), registered midwife (RM), licensed midwife (LM), depending on availability of state licensure for non-nurse midwives.
Etymology Ancient Greek doulē, meaning female who helps Middle English Mid meaning with & Old English wif meaning woman.
Certification Childbirth International, D.O.N.A (Doulas of North America), and C.A.P.P.A. In Canada: C.A.R.E. (Canadian Association Registry and education) North American Registry of Midwives & American College of Nurse Midwives. In Canada: Registered by the College of Alberta Midvives (AAM) and Canadian Association of MIdwives (CAM)
Salary $300 to $1000 per pregnancy they assisted mother in, depending on factors like cost of living, employer, credentials, experience. $40, 000 – $90, 000 as a base salary respect to change according to the employer, education, experience of the midwife etc.

Types & Duties

A doula can characteristically be classified into three types: prenatal doula,childbirth doula and postpartum doula. Based on the qualification, a doula may assist a pregnant woman before child birth by getting her necessary commodities and preparing her to deliver a baby. A childbirth doula, does just that, i.e. helps a pregnant woman deliver a baby. Her role may include assisting the mother during childbirth by supporting her emotionally etc. However, a postpartum doula can help a mother after child birth with all the essential chores at home, including but not limited to cooking, caring for the child, assisting in breast feeding etc.

Typically, there are two types of midwives: Direct-entry midwives, who usually enter directly into midwifery education programs without a prior professional credential and Certified nurse-midwives who are registered nurses before entering midwifery training. A midwife’s duties include helping child bearing women during labor, childbirth and providing postpartum care until the baby is six weeks old.

Etymology

The word Doula is derived from the Ancient Greek word doulē, meaning female slave.

The term Midwife is derived from Middle English word mid meaning with an Old English word wif meaning woman.

Salary

An experienced doula can earn anywhere from $300 to $1000 a time in the United States of America. These rates are flexible and usually depend on the cost of living of the area where the service is being delivered.

A midwife however, can make up to $40,000 – $90,000 a year in the United States of America. The amount mentioned is the base pay and can differ based on your employer, industry, credentials, experience etc.

Certification

Though it isn’t essential for a doula to be certified by an agency or an institution, many women prefer their doulas to meet some basic requirements. These requirements can be fulfilled from various doula certifying agencies across the country or even by appearing for exams over the internet. Doulas need to attend specific number of births before they can be certified, which varies from agency to agency. A few agencies in the United States are : Childbirth International and Doulas of North America.

Midwives can be certified through North American Registry of Midwives for Certified Professional Midwife, American College of Nurse Midwives for Certified Nurse-Midwife.

References

What is a Doula vs. Midwife

[Article below is from   http://www.diffen.com/difference/Doula_vs_Midwife }

Childbirth today has several alternatives to the standard hospital experience with an obstetrician, and doula and midwife are just two of many.

A doula is an assistant who provides physical as well as emotional support during childbirth. She helps women in a non-medical capacity.

A midwife is a qualified professional from an institution of her country, which enables her to help a pregnant woman in delivering a baby. The World Health Organization defines a midwife as: A person who, having been regularly admitted to a midwifery educational program that is duly recognized in the country in which it is located, has successfully completed the prescribed course of studies in midwifery and has acquired the requisite qualifications to be registered and/or legally licensed to practice midwifery. The educational program may be an apprenticeship, a formal university program, or a combination.

Comparison chart

Doula versus Midwife comparison chart
  Doula Midwife
Definition A doula is an assistant who provides physical as well as emotional support during childbirth. She helps women in a non-medical capacity. A midwife is a qualified professional from an institution of her country, which enables her to help a pregnant woman in delivering a baby.
Duties Prenatal Doula aids with Educating women about their own choices regarding options for their upcoming birth of their child. Childbirth Doula helps the mother during labor and childbirth. Postpartum Doula offers services after the child is born Aids with preventive measures, the promotion of normal birth, the detection of complications in mother and child, accessing of medical or other appropriate assistance and the carrying out of emergency measures.
Types Prenatal, Childbirth and Postpartum Doulas. Certified nurse midwife (CNM), certified professional midwife (CPM), direct-entry midwife (DEM), registered midwife (RM), licensed midwife (LM), depending on availability of state licensure for non-nurse midwives.
Etymology Ancient Greek doulē, meaning female who helps Middle English Mid meaning with & Old English wif meaning woman.
Certification Childbirth International, D.O.N.A (Doulas of North America), and C.A.P.P.A. In Canada: C.A.R.E. (Canadian Association Registry and education) North American Registry of Midwives & American College of Nurse Midwives. In Canada: Registered by the College of Alberta Midvives (AAM) and Canadian Association of MIdwives (CAM)
Salary $300 to $1000 per pregnancy they assisted mother in, depending on factors like cost of living, employer, credentials, experience. $40, 000 – $90, 000 as a base salary respect to change according to the employer, education, experience of the midwife etc.

Types & Duties

A doula can characteristically be classified into three types: prenatal doula, childbirth doula and postpartum doula. Based on the qualification, a doula may assist a pregnant woman before child birth by getting her necessary commodities and preparing her to deliver a baby. A childbirth doula, does just that, i.e. helps a pregnant woman deliver a baby. Her role may include assisting the mother during childbirth by supporting her emotionally etc. However, a postpartum doula can help a mother after child birth with all the essential chores at home, including but not limited to cooking, caring for the child, assisting in breast feeding etc.

Typically, there are two types of midwives: Direct-entry midwives, who usually enter directly into midwifery education programs without a prior professional credential and Certified nurse-midwives who are registered nurses before entering midwifery training. A midwife’s duties include helping child bearing women during labor, childbirth and providing postpartum care until the baby is six weeks old.

Etymology

The word Doula is derived from the Ancient Greek word doulē, meaning female slave.

The term Midwife is derived from Middle English word mid meaning with an Old English word wif meaning woman.

Salary

An experienced doula can earn anywhere from $300 to $1000 a time in the United States of America. These rates are flexible and usually depend on the cost of living of the area where the service is being delivered.

A midwife however, can make up to $40,000 – $90,000 a year in the United States of America. The amount mentioned is the base pay and can differ based on your employer, industry, credentials, experience etc.

Certification

Though it isn’t essential for a doula to be certified by an agency or an institution, many women prefer their doulas to meet some basic requirements. These requirements can be fulfilled from various doula certifying agencies across the country or even by appearing for exams over the internet. Doulas need to attend specific number of births before they can be certified, which varies from agency to agency. A few agencies in the United States are : Childbirth International and Doulas of North America.

Midwives can be certified through North American Registry of Midwives for Certified Professional Midwife, American College of Nurse Midwives for Certified Nurse-Midwife.

References

Doula Expense Covered!?!

Would you love to hire a Doula but you honestly can’t afford one? Fear not! Your Health Insurance may cover it!

There is a great post on BirthSource.com about Third Party Reimbursement for Doulas aka Insurance pays the Doula’s Fees.

Over twenty insurance companies have begun paying for doula services and, now that there is a CPT code covering doula services, this is more of a possibility than ever before. (CPT stands for Current Procedural Terminology, and is a copyright of the American Medical Association.) The CPT code commonly used to claim doula services is 99499 for Evaluation and Management Services/Labor Support.

The fact that their insurance company might reimburse at least some portion of the fee for your services might make you attractive to a group of potential clients who might not have been interested before. Getting reimbursement for doula services requires patience and persistence, but it can be done. If you are going to offer this as a possibility for your clients, you will also need to be willing to offer some guidance and, most likely, a fair amount of support, as they attempt to get reimbursed.

The following is a partial list of insurance companies have reimbursed in whole or in part for doula services:

Aetna Healthcare

AltPro

Baylor Health Care System/WEB TPA

Blue Cross/Blue Shield

Blue Cross/ Blue Shield PPO

Cigna

Degussa, a German Chemical Company

Elmcare, LLC, C/O North American Medical Management

Foundation for Medical Care

Fortis Insurance

Glencare Managed Health Inc.

Great-West Life & Annuity Ins. Co.

HNTB (Peoria, IL)

Houston New England Financial, Employee Benefits (Fort Scott, KS)

Humana Employers Health

Lutheran General Physician’s Organization

Maritime Life

Medical Mutual

Oschner HMO, Louisiana

Professional Benefits Administrators

Prudential Healthcare

Qualchoice

Summit Management Services, Inc

Travelers

United HealthCare of Georgia (San Antonio, TX)

United Health POS

Wausau Benefits, Inc

Thanks so much for April Kline for putting the list together.

How to Request Insurance Reimbursement for Doula Services

___     Pay your doula in full.

___     Get an invoice from her which includes the following information:

  1. The doula’s name and address
  2. Her social security number/taxpayer ID number or NPI number
  3. The date and location services were provided
  4. The CPT code for the services provided
  5. A diagnosis code
  6. The doula’s signature

___     Submit the invoice with a claim form to your insurance company.

___     Within four weeks, expect a letter telling you either that

  1. They need more information before they can process your claim.
  2. This is not a covered expense.

___     Ask your Doula to send you the following:

  1. A copy of her certification (if she is certified)
  2. Other credentials or relevant training
  3. A letter detailing her training and experience and what she did for you

___     If possible, ask your obstetrician or midwife for a letter explaining why a doula helped you, was necessary, or saved the insurance company money. (Did you have a high-risk pregnancy? Did the doula’s suggestions appear to prevent complications or help your labor to progress more quickly? Did the doula’s presence decrease your need for expensive pain medications?)

___     Write a letter explaining why you felt the need for a doula and how you believe the doula was beneficial to your health.

___     Submit to your insurance company: the doula’s letter and credentials the letter from the doctor your cover letter

___     If they refuse it, write a letter to Health Services requesting that they review the claim, as you feel it was a cost-cutting measure and they should cover the cost.

___     Follow up by telephone if necessary.

___      If they refuse, write a letter to the CEO explaining why you feel that doula care should be a covered expense. They may not pay your claim, but they will consider it for the future. (Kelli Way, ICCE, CD(DONA) 1998.

If you are a doula, I suggest you click over and read the guide to getting a National Provider Number and helping your clients get reimbursed.

Also, here is a pdf from DONA with several FAQ’s on insurance reimbursement.

Doulas – Do you have a Provider Number? Have you had your services covered by insurance? Please share your experience! 

 SUCH A BIG THANKS FOR AnthroDoula for sharing this with us!