Advice for Mother at the time of Birth ~Spiritual Midwifery

“At a birthing, the mother is the main channel of life force. If she is cooperative and selfless and brave, it makes there be more energy for everyone, including her baby who is getting born. Giving somebody some makes you and everyone else feel good. You don’t have your baby out yet to cuddle and hold; so giving the midwives and your husband some is giving your baby some. If you are in a hospital, you can make there be more energy by finding someone you can connect and be friends with.

During a rush, keep your eyes open, and keep paying attention to those around you and to what’s happening. If you feel afraid or if something is happening that makes you uptight, report it—the midwives can help sort it out until it feels good.

Don’t complain, it makes things worse. If you usually complain, practice not doing it during pregnancy. It will build character.

Talk nice; it will keep your bottom loose so it can open up easier. It’s okay to ask the midwives or your husband to do something for you, like rub your legs or get a glass of water. Ask real nice and give folks “folks some when they do something for you.

Be grateful that you’re having a baby, and be grateful to your partner who’s helping you—it’s an experience that you only do a few times in your life, so make the very most of it, and get your head in a place where you can get as high as possible.

Remember you have a real, live baby in there. Sometimes it’s such an intense trip having a baby that you can forget what it’s for!

Learn how to relax—it’s something that requires attention. You may have to put out some effort to gather your attention together enough that you can relax.

Keep your sense of humor—it’s a priceless gem which keeps you remembering where it’s at. If you can’t be a hero, you can at least be funny while being a chicken.

Remember your monkey self knows how to do this really well. Your brain isn’t very reliable as a guide of how to be during childbirth, but your monkey self is.”

Excerpt From: Ina May Gaskin. “Spiritual Midwifery.” Book Publishing Company. iBooks.

Check out this book on the iBooks Store: https://itun.es/us/JjV4x.l

Midwifery Myths Set Straight by ourmomentoftruth.com

The profession of midwifery has evolved with today’s modern health care system. But there are many myths about midwives in the United States based on centuries-old images or simple misunderstandings. You might be surprised to learn the truth about some of these common midwifery myths.

 

True or False?

Midwives have no formal education.

FALSE. Most midwives in the United States have a master’s degree and are required to pass a national certification exam. There are many different types of midwives, each holding different certifications based on their education and/or experience. Certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) and certified midwives (CMs) attend approximately 93% of all midwife-attended births in the United States, and as of 2010 they are required to have a master’s degree in order to practice midwifery.

Midwives and physicians work together.

TRUE. CNMs and CMs work with all members of the health care team, including physicians. Midwifery care fits well with the services provided by obstetrician/gynecologists (OB/GYNs), who are experts in high risk, medical complications, and surgery. By working with OB/GYNs, midwives can ensure that a specialist is available if a high-risk condition should arise. Likewise, many OB/GYN practices include midwives who specialize in care for women through normal, healthy life events. In this way, all women can receive the right care for their individual health care needs.

Midwives only focus on pregnancy and birth.

FALSE. Midwives have expert knowledge and skill in caring for women through pregnancy, birth, and the postpartum period. But they also do much more. CNMs and CMs provide health care services to women in all stages of life, from the teenage years through menopause, including general health check-ups, screenings and vaccinations; pregnancy, birth, and postpartum care; well woman gynecologic care; treatment of sexually transmitted infections; and prescribing medications, including all forms of pain control medications and birth control.

Midwives can prescribe medications and order tests.

TRUE. CNMs and CMs are licensed to prescribe a full range of substances, medications, and treatments, including pain control medications and birth control. They can also order needed medical tests within their scope of practice and consistent with state laws and practice guidelines.

Midwives cannot care for me if I have a chronic health condition or my pregnancy is considered high-risk.

FALSE. Midwives are able to provide different levels of care depending on a woman’s individual health needs. If you have a chronic health condition, a midwife still may be able to provide some or all of your direct care services. In other cases, a midwife may play a more of a supportive role and help you work with other health care providers to address your personal health care challenges. In a high-risk pregnancy, a midwife can help you access resources to support your goals for childbirth, provide emotional support during challenging times, or work alongside specialists who are experts in your high-risk condition to ensure safe, healthy outcomes.

Midwives offer pain relief to women during labor.

TRUE. Midwives are leading experts in how to cope with labor pain. As a partner with you in your health care, your midwife will explain pain relief options and help you develop a birth plan that best fits your personal needs and desires. Whether you wish to use methods such as relaxation techniques or movement during labor or try IV, epidural, or other medications, your midwife will work with you to help meet your desired approach to birth. At the same time, your midwife will provide you with information and resources about the different options and choices available if any changes to your birth plan become necessary or if you change your mind.

Midwives only attend births at home.

FALSE. Midwives practice in many different settings, including hospitals, medical offices, free-standing birth centers, clinics, and/or private settings (such as your home). In fact, because many women who choose a midwife for their care wish to deliver their babies in a hospital, many hospitals in the United States offer an in-house midwifery service. And because midwives are dedicated to one-on-one care, many practice in more than one setting to help ensure that women have access to the range of services they need or desire and to allow for specific health considerations. In 2012, about 95% of births attended by midwives in the United States were in hospitals.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15YAObX_lrM#action=share

The New York Amsterdam News — Millennial doula

The 21st century lends itself to a shift in the role of women in society. Inspirational women have been around for centuries, with the 1990s giving birth to the next generation of creative and exceptional female activists.

At 24 years old, Yasmintheresa Garcia is one such outstanding individual. A Brooklyn native born to Afro-Dominican parents, she recognized her calling as a doula from a very young age. In addition to successfully managing her own doula practice, Ythedoula, Garcia is a midwife in training, community activist and vegan health coach. Doulas are not medically licensed.

Garcia gained interest in the vocation at the age of 12, when a number of fellow students became pregnant. “I started giving them advice and giving them emotional and educational support that they needed that they weren’t receiving from the community they lived in,” said Garcia in an interview.

Community uplift and female education is the reason Garcia has created a get together called Ythegirlshangout. A group for women of all ages and backgrounds come together in a sacred space to discuss everything from financial literacy to career goals and body images. “Things that we in our culture wouldn’t normally speak of in our household,” said Garcia.

Click to continue to read the rest of the article published; Or pick up your paper copy out now!

new-arrows12-150x150.png

http://amsterdamnews.com/news/2016/aug/25/millennial-doulayasmintheresa-garcia/#at_pco=smlwn-1.0&at_si=57bef933ff280040&at_ab=per-2&at_pos=0&at_tot=1

Let Your Voice Be Heard Presents: The Dreamer and Doer Series Featuring: Yasmintheresa Garcia

Each month, Let Your Voice Be Heard! Radio presents “The Dreamer and Doer Series,” which spotlights inspirational Millennials who are using their talents and influence to better their community and the world. In July 2016, we spoke to Yasmintheresa Garcia, the founder of YtheGirls “Hang out,” a Midwife in training, Prenatal & Postnatal Doula, Childbirth Educator, Vegan health coach and Acupressurist.

 

A Calling before a Career

 

Being a birth Doula or Midwife consist of two different responsibilities. It is not a hobby or a job you do because it seems easy. It is not a job for the weak minded or selfish hearted.

Being a Doula is a metaphysical calling on your soul to want to be apart of ushering in new life knowing that you will do more Good than harm as a gatekeeper of the cycle of life. What both a Midwife & Doula do have in common is that both roles have a responsibility to educate & empower their clients in order to make evidence based decisions that are best for their family in respect to their culture. We are pretty much the gate keepers of the human life cycle we often witness death and birth at the same time. Perhaps in most cases death of an old life style and birth of a new life and new adventure of a whole family. How we practice in both roles has a major effect on how that family will transition into, and operate in their new life style. 

Be passionate about your calling in life and live it to the fullest. ~YtheDoula

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A fit pregnancy & a Doula who supports it!

Draya Michele is the star of VH1’s hit series Basketball Wives LA, a mommy of two beautiful boys, two twin stepdaughters, a fiancé, and creator of the beautiful and reputable swimwear line MINTSWIM. Among all that she is an actress and entrepreneur with a business savvy mind.

                     Draya’s Timeless Maternity Shoot                        

by, von_jackson

 

Draya Michele caught my attention when I came across a photo of her at the gym while being pregnant. Immediately I decided to follow her journey throughout her pregnancy to see how she would stay fit during and after birthing her new joy. She recently shared her secrets to getting her body back snatched after giving birth in a recent podcast interview with Tia Mowry in her new show “Mostly Mom wih Tia Mowry.”

 

http://www.podcastone.com/pg/jsp/program/episode.jsp?programID=861&pid=1651158

 

At 36 minutes Draya Michelle begins to talk about her workout regimen and how she committed herself for the first time in her life to stay on a safe and consistent work out routine.

Draya went to the gym religiously, 5 days a week for 8 months and ate well!

This hot mama says, she never got back to her hot body; she never left. She didn’t get snatched back up, she worked her butt off and always stayed fit. Which breaks the stereotypes of the “all woman gain weight and get out of shape during pregnancy” myth. Draya also stated something very important that many of us may over look. I had to meditate on this also; She stated she went to the gym for 5 days consecutively weekly like clockwork. Now that is commitment! Almost as if her gym routine was part of her full time job and many of us could learn something from this. We must admit we don’t always take that much time out of our week to take care of ourselves let alone our personal health.

As a birth coach Doula, I cannot stress how important it is to do this. The nine months that a mum is pregnant should not consist of being so busy getting everything done before baby comes that she forgets to be still and enjoy the journey and evolution of your body. Mum’s can take even 20 minutes out their day at home to do yoga just to keep their body in motion, encourage their blood circulating and muscles reminded to stay active not stagnant so that when baby comes into the world and out of her body, the muscles in her body will remember to snatch back when ready.

 

Many celebrity mums like Ciara and Kelly Rowland seem to understand the importance of staying fit and active during their pregnancy. Some may think they do it to end up in the magazines weeks after giving birth but I believe they understand the more active you are the less risks involved during labor and postnatal recovery.

 

Draya Michele gave birth to her beautiful baby boy Jru all natural and even caught him with her own hands. You can catch the video on her Instagram page. I personally commented for her not to remove it because it is all too inspiring.  https://www.instagram.com/drayamichele/?hl=en

She also shared this beautiful message about her pregnancy and childbirth experience,

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Why not enough media on Celebrity Natural Birth? 

Lets be real, perhaps we didn’t see much coverage about Draya’s fantastic and inspiring birth journey because there were no endorsements involved. She claimed her truth by speaking out on having done it the healthy and simple way, work out, eat clean, stay committed, stay in harmony and birth your own way. Her way was in the hospital in silence with the least amount of hospital staff and a serene atmosphere. You can’t really capitalize off a Warrior mama’s super powers because only she holds her own power. Therefore I needed to share her inspiring journey that many over look. She looks great and is still glowing.

 

Birth Coaches/Doulas & What we do?

I have been fortunate enough to have worked with woman who have been athletes, lead a very active lifestyle or where determined to start. In working with these woman I have calculated why they have had natural and healthy labors and or recoveries after childbirth. Granted, we cannot control the law of the universe and every birth is different. However the mum’s that I have coach throughout their pregnancy have had great experiences based on a few tools that I shared with them.

Meditate : At home, before sleep in bed, while showering, in yoga, while reading. Just find that time for you to be still and conquer your thoughts and questions and concerns then talk to your Doula Birth Coach about them.

Stay Active: If you are not a former athlete I will advise on what the mother of Modern day Midwifery, Ina May Gaskin once said about the importance of doing squats or wall sits. It helps flex your pelvis and sincerely creates much needed blood flow in your abdominal area. (If there are concerns about squats inducing labor? Please do it at the discretion of your medical provider. Plus there is levels to squats. You don’t need to drop it all the way low if you are concerned.) Squats also build up your lower abdominal and lower back muscles which will strongly help when pushing your baby into the world.

Working out when pregnant is as important as working out when your not pregnant! It helps to reduce edema, stress, normalize hormones, stay in shape, increase blood flow, and balance hormones.

 

 

Remember!

Stay hydrated: Drink at least a gallon of water daily plus coconut water which has great vitamins and minerals for your body.

My practice consist of becoming an assistant to mum in whatever she desires her pregnancy and labor journey to be. As a former sports coach and dietetic intern I often encourage mums to take care of themselves as well as help them find the right resources they need. As a Doula I go to the gym or a pregnancy workout class with an expecting mum if she needs company or I educate her about her options for staying healthy and prepared for laboring her baby. After all, laboring is not this unbearable feeling mum’s experience. It truly is a right of passage that woman should celebrate and be excited for. All while, dad and Doula are massaging her or coaching her through contractions of course. Be sure to be open and let your Doula know what you want your labor experience to be like and ask her how to be the best care taker for you. We serve you mums. Its what we’ve been called to do. ~YtheDoula

 

For more info…

Top tips for activity in pregnancy

 

What is a Doula vs. Midwife

[Article below is from   http://www.diffen.com/difference/Doula_vs_Midwife }

Childbirth today has several alternatives to the standard hospital experience with an obstetrician, and doula and midwife are just two of many.

A doula is an assistant who provides physical as well as emotional support during childbirth. She helps women in a non-medical capacity.

A midwife is a qualified professional from an institution of her country, which enables her to help a pregnant woman in delivering a baby. The World Health Organization defines a midwife as: A person who, having been regularly admitted to a midwifery educational program that is duly recognized in the country in which it is located, has successfully completed the prescribed course of studies in midwifery and has acquired the requisite qualifications to be registered and/or legally licensed to practice midwifery. The educational program may be an apprenticeship, a formal university program, or a combination.

Comparison chart

Doula versus Midwife comparison chart
  Doula Midwife
Definition A doula is an assistant who provides physical as well as emotional support during childbirth. She helps women in a non-medical capacity. A midwife is a qualified professional from an institution of her country, which enables her to help a pregnant woman in delivering a baby.
Duties Prenatal Doula aids with Educating women about their own choices regarding options for their upcoming birth of their child. Childbirth Doula helps the mother during labor and childbirth. Postpartum Doula offers services after the child is born Aids with preventive measures, the promotion of normal birth, the detection of complications in mother and child, accessing of medical or other appropriate assistance and the carrying out of emergency measures.
Types Prenatal, Childbirth and Postpartum Doulas. Certified nurse midwife (CNM), certified professional midwife (CPM), direct-entry midwife (DEM), registered midwife (RM), licensed midwife (LM), depending on availability of state licensure for non-nurse midwives.
Etymology Ancient Greek doulē, meaning female who helps Middle English Mid meaning with & Old English wif meaning woman.
Certification Childbirth International, D.O.N.A (Doulas of North America), and C.A.P.P.A. In Canada: C.A.R.E. (Canadian Association Registry and education) North American Registry of Midwives & American College of Nurse Midwives. In Canada: Registered by the College of Alberta Midvives (AAM) and Canadian Association of MIdwives (CAM)
Salary $300 to $1000 per pregnancy they assisted mother in, depending on factors like cost of living, employer, credentials, experience. $40, 000 – $90, 000 as a base salary respect to change according to the employer, education, experience of the midwife etc.

Types & Duties

A doula can characteristically be classified into three types: prenatal doula,childbirth doula and postpartum doula. Based on the qualification, a doula may assist a pregnant woman before child birth by getting her necessary commodities and preparing her to deliver a baby. A childbirth doula, does just that, i.e. helps a pregnant woman deliver a baby. Her role may include assisting the mother during childbirth by supporting her emotionally etc. However, a postpartum doula can help a mother after child birth with all the essential chores at home, including but not limited to cooking, caring for the child, assisting in breast feeding etc.

Typically, there are two types of midwives: Direct-entry midwives, who usually enter directly into midwifery education programs without a prior professional credential and Certified nurse-midwives who are registered nurses before entering midwifery training. A midwife’s duties include helping child bearing women during labor, childbirth and providing postpartum care until the baby is six weeks old.

Etymology

The word Doula is derived from the Ancient Greek word doulē, meaning female slave.

The term Midwife is derived from Middle English word mid meaning with an Old English word wif meaning woman.

Salary

An experienced doula can earn anywhere from $300 to $1000 a time in the United States of America. These rates are flexible and usually depend on the cost of living of the area where the service is being delivered.

A midwife however, can make up to $40,000 – $90,000 a year in the United States of America. The amount mentioned is the base pay and can differ based on your employer, industry, credentials, experience etc.

Certification

Though it isn’t essential for a doula to be certified by an agency or an institution, many women prefer their doulas to meet some basic requirements. These requirements can be fulfilled from various doula certifying agencies across the country or even by appearing for exams over the internet. Doulas need to attend specific number of births before they can be certified, which varies from agency to agency. A few agencies in the United States are : Childbirth International and Doulas of North America.

Midwives can be certified through North American Registry of Midwives for Certified Professional Midwife, American College of Nurse Midwives for Certified Nurse-Midwife.

References

Meant to be a Doula

Meant to be a Doula

It is no surprise to me that I have ended up here as a protégé of midwifery services. At the age of 14 was when my obsession with the miraculous act of child birth began. I remember watching everything that had to do with child birth on the te-lie-vision (tv) and doing independent research on how my body will one day experience the magic itself. Then was when my journey to becoming a sexual reproduction educator and doula began. I do also recall being a very eager 12 year old wanting to know exactly what was happening to my body the moment I got my first period. Yes, I was that person who googled everything and joined the mailing list on those tween websites to receive free tampons and pads. They also gave cool diagrams and coloring books to know exactly how your uterus functioned! Who wouldn’t want that as keep sake?

Habits create a life style…

Oddly enough I can remember my first science project for my freshman year science fair. My project was based on the reproduction cycles of both men and woman which was followed by a presentation of both female and male contraceptives. How ironic, I know. Today I don’t believe in contraceptives. I have learned there are many different forms of contraceptives that don’t come out of a box. We’ll get to that later.  I was pretty pretentious to go out in front of the whole school, try and teach everyone about sex and contraceptives while being a virgin. I guess you can really say those who don’t do, teach.

Welcoming womanhood…

Now through the coming of a woman journey that I have experienced throughout the few decades of living on this earth, I have finally realized what truly made me happy to wake up each morning and motivated me to live each day. It was the reality of life being born around us every second. Within finding myself as a woman through mile stones, hardships and exploring the greatness in my sexuality I had made a decision to be a part of the Welcoming life Crew. (WLC includes, OBGs, Midwives, Doulas, Nurses, Witch Doctors) whatever you shall call them if they deliver or assist in delivering new life they are a part of that crew that I just made up, Welcoming Life Crew.

Being Proactic

Destiny is not a matter of chance, but of choice. Not something to wish for, but to attain.                          – William Jennings Bryan

A few months ago when I looked at my life and what I was doing; I realized I wasn’t fulfilling something inside of me. I worked for the 9th biggest company in this country and I felt as if I was dying inside. One day after watching a documentary by Rikki Lake and Abby Epstein, “The Business of Being Born”. I instantly knew why I was so passionate about birth and “Welcoming Life” into this world. >>What went through my mind was, Every time a new life is born into this world is another message being told to us by the Universe, by God, by a Higher Power that it hasn’t given up on us. In that moment I knew that I wanted to be a part of that message. I want to be the advocate of New Life being born into this world with a chance of a better tomorrow or at least a better today. This is why I am on my journey to being a DONA certified Doula with emphasis on natural birth because I was born to serve my people, my sisters and empower them to do what they biologically were born to do.  ~YtheG

What is a Doula vs. Midwife

Tanya_Midwife_Doula_Hubby

[Article below is from   http://www.diffen.com/difference/Doula_vs_Midwife }

Childbirth today has several alternatives to the standard hospital experience with an obstetrician, and doula and midwife are just two of many.

A doula is an assistant who provides physical as well as emotional support during childbirth. She helps women in a non-medical capacity.

A midwife is a qualified professional from an institution of her country, which enables her to help a pregnant woman in delivering a baby. The World Health Organization defines a midwife as: A person who, having been regularly admitted to a midwifery educational program that is duly recognized in the country in which it is located, has successfully completed the prescribed course of studies in midwifery and has acquired the requisite qualifications to be registered and/or legally licensed to practice midwifery. The educational program may be an apprenticeship, a formal university program, or a combination.

Comparison chart

Doula versus Midwife comparison chart
  Doula Midwife
Definition A doula is an assistant who provides physical as well as emotional support during childbirth. She helps women in a non-medical capacity. A midwife is a qualified professional from an institution of her country, which enables her to help a pregnant woman in delivering a baby.
Duties Prenatal Doula aids with Educating women about their own choices regarding options for their upcoming birth of their child. Childbirth Doula helps the mother during labor and childbirth. Postpartum Doula offers services after the child is born Aids with preventive measures, the promotion of normal birth, the detection of complications in mother and child, accessing of medical or other appropriate assistance and the carrying out of emergency measures.
Types Prenatal, Childbirth and Postpartum Doulas. Certified nurse midwife (CNM), certified professional midwife (CPM), direct-entry midwife (DEM), registered midwife (RM), licensed midwife (LM), depending on availability of state licensure for non-nurse midwives.
Etymology Ancient Greek doulē, meaning female who helps Middle English Mid meaning with & Old English wif meaning woman.
Certification Childbirth International, D.O.N.A (Doulas of North America), and C.A.P.P.A. In Canada: C.A.R.E. (Canadian Association Registry and education) North American Registry of Midwives & American College of Nurse Midwives. In Canada: Registered by the College of Alberta Midvives (AAM) and Canadian Association of MIdwives (CAM)
Salary $300 to $1000 per pregnancy they assisted mother in, depending on factors like cost of living, employer, credentials, experience. $40, 000 – $90, 000 as a base salary respect to change according to the employer, education, experience of the midwife etc.

Types & Duties

A doula can characteristically be classified into three types: prenatal doula,childbirth doula and postpartum doula. Based on the qualification, a doula may assist a pregnant woman before child birth by getting her necessary commodities and preparing her to deliver a baby. A childbirth doula, does just that, i.e. helps a pregnant woman deliver a baby. Her role may include assisting the mother during childbirth by supporting her emotionally etc. However, a postpartum doula can help a mother after child birth with all the essential chores at home, including but not limited to cooking, caring for the child, assisting in breast feeding etc.

Typically, there are two types of midwives: Direct-entry midwives, who usually enter directly into midwifery education programs without a prior professional credential and Certified nurse-midwives who are registered nurses before entering midwifery training. A midwife’s duties include helping child bearing women during labor, childbirth and providing postpartum care until the baby is six weeks old.

Etymology

The word Doula is derived from the Ancient Greek word doulē, meaning female slave.

The term Midwife is derived from Middle English word mid meaning with an Old English word wif meaning woman.

Salary

An experienced doula can earn anywhere from $300 to $1000 a time in the United States of America. These rates are flexible and usually depend on the cost of living of the area where the service is being delivered.

A midwife however, can make up to $40,000 – $90,000 a year in the United States of America. The amount mentioned is the base pay and can differ based on your employer, industry, credentials, experience etc.

Certification

Though it isn’t essential for a doula to be certified by an agency or an institution, many women prefer their doulas to meet some basic requirements. These requirements can be fulfilled from various doula certifying agencies across the country or even by appearing for exams over the internet. Doulas need to attend specific number of births before they can be certified, which varies from agency to agency. A few agencies in the United States are : Childbirth International and Doulas of North America.

Midwives can be certified through North American Registry of Midwives for Certified Professional Midwife, American College of Nurse Midwives for Certified Nurse-Midwife.

References