Waist beads, and how they’re keeping me fit!

Earlier this year my Sacred Woman sisters introduced me to the beautiful traditions of waist beads that had originated from our Nubian ancestors of Ancient Kemet. I kept telling myself I would eventually get them but when I got them around this time last month it was the best thing I ever did for my womanhood. As an afro-dominican, my culture has discouraged so much of our beautiful and imperative African traditions claiming most of them pertaining to women to be taboo. I recall being a Teen and having my father become so upset with me when he would find me wearing ankle bracelets. He being such a prideful man, never needed to give me an excuse for why I was not aloud to wear them and I would of course, hide it from him when I did. One day when I got older I asked him why it bothered him so much when he found me wearing it again, this time with determination not to take it off without a valid explanation from him as to why he was so opposed to me wearing an accessory on my own foot.  My father when on to tell me that he disliked me wearing ankles and toe rings because it was for hoers. Imagine my facial expression trying so hard to understand what kind of experience my dad may have had that made him feel such a way about a woman adorning her legs with jewels. Needles to say that with all do respect I could not continue to consider my dads incredibly ridiculous wish and reasoning for what I wore on my body. I continued to love my body accessories. I later began to research more about the history of why African women (& Africans of the diaspora) traditionally adorned their beautiful bodies with jewels. Then I met my sisters and two of them being sacred waist bead creators, I knew I had to finally get some of my own and truly embrace my womanhood.

Waist beads keep me fit and feeling sexy 

The moment my graduation of Queen Afua’s Sacred Woman Rites of passage program came to completion I got the opportunity to purchase my waist beads from my sis, Zanetta who fitted me on the spot and adorned me with two of her creations one, slightly snug and the other perfectly fitting to my waist. One made of regular stones and the other made with Womb healing stones. She blessed me with fitting me so perfectly into these beads that somehow I knew now that I had to get back to having a slimmer waistline in order to not feel uncomfortable wearing these beads. My body type is one that when I drink or eat too much I am immediately bloated. I understand the physiology of my intricate body and now these waist beads made me keep my body on check when eating, sleeping and exercising. Having my body adorned with waist beads didn’t mean that I will only feel super sexy and beautiful in my own skin every time I saw myself in the mirror but it also meant that I would now be cautious of the way I took care of my body in order to make sure the waist beads fit my waist and flattered me for myself and for my love. These waist beads have been a godsend. Now I am more in love with my midsection. I protect it more from harmful food and neglect and I am also determined to do core ab exercises daily to make sure my stomach matches the sexiness of my beads. I like my stomach flat and fit and these beads motivate me to keep it this way.

August 2016 Favorites* https://ythegarcia.com/2016/08/23/waist-beads/

Keep reading below and be astonished as to how these beads are actually made to keep women, their wombs and abdomen healthy and fit. I found this article by a Ghanaian bead maker based out of Georgia and I had to share it here for you all to read. Enjoy! Support and get your beads, beauties. *Quick note before these wack copy cat celebrities catch on to this traditional accessory and try and call it their trend just remember we have been adorning our temples since the beginning of time. So be your true self today before some else takes your culture and sells it back to you tomorrow.*

Waist by Wednesday 

The history of waist beads dates back to antiquity. Many believe that the history begins in ancient Egypt where they were called “girdles” and were worn by women as a status symbol. In West Africa, the tradition was made popular by the Yoruban tribe of Nigeria. They are worn as a celebration of womanhood, sexuality, femininity, fertility, healing, spirituality, body shaping, protection and wealth.

Yoruban woman are known to have once laced beads with charms and fragrances that would be considered irresistible to the opposite sex. This practice is now less popular, however wearing beads for the seduction of men is still one of the primary reasons some women wear them. Waist beads can be considered as “African Lingerie.”

Most of Waists by Wednesday’s beads are imported from Ghana, which also has a rich tradition of wearing waist beads. It is common for women in Ghana to wear waist beads as ornaments, as well as for symbolic adornment, which serves as a sign of wealth, femininity or aristocracy, as well as spiritual well-being. During Ghanaian naming ceremonies, babies are typically adorned with waist beads, while young adults also wear beads around their waists and on their hips during puberty rites as a portrayal of femininity. These beads are believed to possess the power to attract as well as evoke deep emotional responses.

As part of Ghanaian tradition, a successful suitor would commission a set of beads including bracelets, anklets, necklaces, cuffs and waist beads for his bride. This was part of her dowry and the foundation of her personal wealth. Women in Ghana would wear multiple strands of beads around their waist, with some cultures providing that the only person allowed to remove them was her husband on their wedding night.

Many Ghanaian women will tell you that they use their waist beads to shape their waist. It is believed that the practice of wearing multiple waist beads over time will help to keep the waist small and accentuate the hips. Since traditional waist beads are strung on cotton cord (and without a clasp/hook) they can be a good tool to measure weight gain and loss. They will not stretch; they will either break or continue to roll up the waist when weight has been gained. Similarly, they will roll down or eventually become so loose they will fall off when weight has been lost.

Don’t be fooled by photos of only slender women wearing waist beads. Women of all shapes and sizes can confidently adorn themselves with waist beads as well. Because traditionally beads are worn along your panty or bikini line and not your actual waist (which is typically across the belly button), it allows for all women to comfortably wear waist beads no matter their size. Wearing them is really a personal reflection and appreciation for your God-given beauty.

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Midwifery Myths Set Straight by ourmomentoftruth.com

The profession of midwifery has evolved with today’s modern health care system. But there are many myths about midwives in the United States based on centuries-old images or simple misunderstandings. You might be surprised to learn the truth about some of these common midwifery myths.

 

True or False?

Midwives have no formal education.

FALSE. Most midwives in the United States have a master’s degree and are required to pass a national certification exam. There are many different types of midwives, each holding different certifications based on their education and/or experience. Certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) and certified midwives (CMs) attend approximately 93% of all midwife-attended births in the United States, and as of 2010 they are required to have a master’s degree in order to practice midwifery.

Midwives and physicians work together.

TRUE. CNMs and CMs work with all members of the health care team, including physicians. Midwifery care fits well with the services provided by obstetrician/gynecologists (OB/GYNs), who are experts in high risk, medical complications, and surgery. By working with OB/GYNs, midwives can ensure that a specialist is available if a high-risk condition should arise. Likewise, many OB/GYN practices include midwives who specialize in care for women through normal, healthy life events. In this way, all women can receive the right care for their individual health care needs.

Midwives only focus on pregnancy and birth.

FALSE. Midwives have expert knowledge and skill in caring for women through pregnancy, birth, and the postpartum period. But they also do much more. CNMs and CMs provide health care services to women in all stages of life, from the teenage years through menopause, including general health check-ups, screenings and vaccinations; pregnancy, birth, and postpartum care; well woman gynecologic care; treatment of sexually transmitted infections; and prescribing medications, including all forms of pain control medications and birth control.

Midwives can prescribe medications and order tests.

TRUE. CNMs and CMs are licensed to prescribe a full range of substances, medications, and treatments, including pain control medications and birth control. They can also order needed medical tests within their scope of practice and consistent with state laws and practice guidelines.

Midwives cannot care for me if I have a chronic health condition or my pregnancy is considered high-risk.

FALSE. Midwives are able to provide different levels of care depending on a woman’s individual health needs. If you have a chronic health condition, a midwife still may be able to provide some or all of your direct care services. In other cases, a midwife may play a more of a supportive role and help you work with other health care providers to address your personal health care challenges. In a high-risk pregnancy, a midwife can help you access resources to support your goals for childbirth, provide emotional support during challenging times, or work alongside specialists who are experts in your high-risk condition to ensure safe, healthy outcomes.

Midwives offer pain relief to women during labor.

TRUE. Midwives are leading experts in how to cope with labor pain. As a partner with you in your health care, your midwife will explain pain relief options and help you develop a birth plan that best fits your personal needs and desires. Whether you wish to use methods such as relaxation techniques or movement during labor or try IV, epidural, or other medications, your midwife will work with you to help meet your desired approach to birth. At the same time, your midwife will provide you with information and resources about the different options and choices available if any changes to your birth plan become necessary or if you change your mind.

Midwives only attend births at home.

FALSE. Midwives practice in many different settings, including hospitals, medical offices, free-standing birth centers, clinics, and/or private settings (such as your home). In fact, because many women who choose a midwife for their care wish to deliver their babies in a hospital, many hospitals in the United States offer an in-house midwifery service. And because midwives are dedicated to one-on-one care, many practice in more than one setting to help ensure that women have access to the range of services they need or desire and to allow for specific health considerations. In 2012, about 95% of births attended by midwives in the United States were in hospitals.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15YAObX_lrM#action=share

Meant to be a Doula

Meant to be a Doula

It is no surprise to me that I have ended up here as a protégé of midwifery services. At the age of 14 was when my obsession with the miraculous act of child birth began. I remember watching everything that had to do with child birth on the te-lie-vision (tv) and doing independent research on how my body will one day experience the magic itself. Then was when my journey to becoming a sexual reproduction educator and doula began. I do also recall being a very eager 12 year old wanting to know exactly what was happening to my body the moment I got my first period. Yes, I was that person who googled everything and joined the mailing list on those tween websites to receive free tampons and pads. They also gave cool diagrams and coloring books to know exactly how your uterus functioned! Who wouldn’t want that as keep sake?

Habits create a life style…

Oddly enough I can remember my first science project for my freshman year science fair. My project was based on the reproduction cycles of both men and woman which was followed by a presentation of both female and male contraceptives. How ironic, I know. Today I don’t believe in contraceptives. I have learned there are many different forms of contraceptives that don’t come out of a box. We’ll get to that later.  I was pretty pretentious to go out in front of the whole school, try and teach everyone about sex and contraceptives while being a virgin. I guess you can really say those who don’t do, teach.

Welcoming womanhood…

Now through the coming of a woman journey that I have experienced throughout the few decades of living on this earth, I have finally realized what truly made me happy to wake up each morning and motivated me to live each day. It was the reality of life being born around us every second. Within finding myself as a woman through mile stones, hardships and exploring the greatness in my sexuality I had made a decision to be a part of the Welcoming life Crew. (WLC includes, OBGs, Midwives, Doulas, Nurses, Witch Doctors) whatever you shall call them if they deliver or assist in delivering new life they are a part of that crew that I just made up, Welcoming Life Crew.

Being Proactic

Destiny is not a matter of chance, but of choice. Not something to wish for, but to attain.                          – William Jennings Bryan

A few months ago when I looked at my life and what I was doing; I realized I wasn’t fulfilling something inside of me. I worked for the 9th biggest company in this country and I felt as if I was dying inside. One day after watching a documentary by Rikki Lake and Abby Epstein, “The Business of Being Born”. I instantly knew why I was so passionate about birth and “Welcoming Life” into this world. >>What went through my mind was, Every time a new life is born into this world is another message being told to us by the Universe, by God, by a Higher Power that it hasn’t given up on us. In that moment I knew that I wanted to be a part of that message. I want to be the advocate of New Life being born into this world with a chance of a better tomorrow or at least a better today. This is why I am on my journey to being a DONA certified Doula with emphasis on natural birth because I was born to serve my people, my sisters and empower them to do what they biologically were born to do.  ~YtheG

What is a Doula vs. Midwife

Tanya_Midwife_Doula_Hubby

[Article below is from   http://www.diffen.com/difference/Doula_vs_Midwife }

Childbirth today has several alternatives to the standard hospital experience with an obstetrician, and doula and midwife are just two of many.

A doula is an assistant who provides physical as well as emotional support during childbirth. She helps women in a non-medical capacity.

A midwife is a qualified professional from an institution of her country, which enables her to help a pregnant woman in delivering a baby. The World Health Organization defines a midwife as: A person who, having been regularly admitted to a midwifery educational program that is duly recognized in the country in which it is located, has successfully completed the prescribed course of studies in midwifery and has acquired the requisite qualifications to be registered and/or legally licensed to practice midwifery. The educational program may be an apprenticeship, a formal university program, or a combination.

Comparison chart

Doula versus Midwife comparison chart
  Doula Midwife
Definition A doula is an assistant who provides physical as well as emotional support during childbirth. She helps women in a non-medical capacity. A midwife is a qualified professional from an institution of her country, which enables her to help a pregnant woman in delivering a baby.
Duties Prenatal Doula aids with Educating women about their own choices regarding options for their upcoming birth of their child. Childbirth Doula helps the mother during labor and childbirth. Postpartum Doula offers services after the child is born Aids with preventive measures, the promotion of normal birth, the detection of complications in mother and child, accessing of medical or other appropriate assistance and the carrying out of emergency measures.
Types Prenatal, Childbirth and Postpartum Doulas. Certified nurse midwife (CNM), certified professional midwife (CPM), direct-entry midwife (DEM), registered midwife (RM), licensed midwife (LM), depending on availability of state licensure for non-nurse midwives.
Etymology Ancient Greek doulē, meaning female who helps Middle English Mid meaning with & Old English wif meaning woman.
Certification Childbirth International, D.O.N.A (Doulas of North America), and C.A.P.P.A. In Canada: C.A.R.E. (Canadian Association Registry and education) North American Registry of Midwives & American College of Nurse Midwives. In Canada: Registered by the College of Alberta Midvives (AAM) and Canadian Association of MIdwives (CAM)
Salary $300 to $1000 per pregnancy they assisted mother in, depending on factors like cost of living, employer, credentials, experience. $40, 000 – $90, 000 as a base salary respect to change according to the employer, education, experience of the midwife etc.

Types & Duties

A doula can characteristically be classified into three types: prenatal doula,childbirth doula and postpartum doula. Based on the qualification, a doula may assist a pregnant woman before child birth by getting her necessary commodities and preparing her to deliver a baby. A childbirth doula, does just that, i.e. helps a pregnant woman deliver a baby. Her role may include assisting the mother during childbirth by supporting her emotionally etc. However, a postpartum doula can help a mother after child birth with all the essential chores at home, including but not limited to cooking, caring for the child, assisting in breast feeding etc.

Typically, there are two types of midwives: Direct-entry midwives, who usually enter directly into midwifery education programs without a prior professional credential and Certified nurse-midwives who are registered nurses before entering midwifery training. A midwife’s duties include helping child bearing women during labor, childbirth and providing postpartum care until the baby is six weeks old.

Etymology

The word Doula is derived from the Ancient Greek word doulē, meaning female slave.

The term Midwife is derived from Middle English word mid meaning with an Old English word wif meaning woman.

Salary

An experienced doula can earn anywhere from $300 to $1000 a time in the United States of America. These rates are flexible and usually depend on the cost of living of the area where the service is being delivered.

A midwife however, can make up to $40,000 – $90,000 a year in the United States of America. The amount mentioned is the base pay and can differ based on your employer, industry, credentials, experience etc.

Certification

Though it isn’t essential for a doula to be certified by an agency or an institution, many women prefer their doulas to meet some basic requirements. These requirements can be fulfilled from various doula certifying agencies across the country or even by appearing for exams over the internet. Doulas need to attend specific number of births before they can be certified, which varies from agency to agency. A few agencies in the United States are : Childbirth International and Doulas of North America.

Midwives can be certified through North American Registry of Midwives for Certified Professional Midwife, American College of Nurse Midwives for Certified Nurse-Midwife.

References

What is a Doula vs. Midwife

[Article below is from   http://www.diffen.com/difference/Doula_vs_Midwife }

Childbirth today has several alternatives to the standard hospital experience with an obstetrician, and doula and midwife are just two of many.

A doula is an assistant who provides physical as well as emotional support during childbirth. She helps women in a non-medical capacity.

A midwife is a qualified professional from an institution of her country, which enables her to help a pregnant woman in delivering a baby. The World Health Organization defines a midwife as: A person who, having been regularly admitted to a midwifery educational program that is duly recognized in the country in which it is located, has successfully completed the prescribed course of studies in midwifery and has acquired the requisite qualifications to be registered and/or legally licensed to practice midwifery. The educational program may be an apprenticeship, a formal university program, or a combination.

Comparison chart

Doula versus Midwife comparison chart
  Doula Midwife
Definition A doula is an assistant who provides physical as well as emotional support during childbirth. She helps women in a non-medical capacity. A midwife is a qualified professional from an institution of her country, which enables her to help a pregnant woman in delivering a baby.
Duties Prenatal Doula aids with Educating women about their own choices regarding options for their upcoming birth of their child. Childbirth Doula helps the mother during labor and childbirth. Postpartum Doula offers services after the child is born Aids with preventive measures, the promotion of normal birth, the detection of complications in mother and child, accessing of medical or other appropriate assistance and the carrying out of emergency measures.
Types Prenatal, Childbirth and Postpartum Doulas. Certified nurse midwife (CNM), certified professional midwife (CPM), direct-entry midwife (DEM), registered midwife (RM), licensed midwife (LM), depending on availability of state licensure for non-nurse midwives.
Etymology Ancient Greek doulē, meaning female who helps Middle English Mid meaning with & Old English wif meaning woman.
Certification Childbirth International, D.O.N.A (Doulas of North America), and C.A.P.P.A. In Canada: C.A.R.E. (Canadian Association Registry and education) North American Registry of Midwives & American College of Nurse Midwives. In Canada: Registered by the College of Alberta Midvives (AAM) and Canadian Association of MIdwives (CAM)
Salary $300 to $1000 per pregnancy they assisted mother in, depending on factors like cost of living, employer, credentials, experience. $40, 000 – $90, 000 as a base salary respect to change according to the employer, education, experience of the midwife etc.

Types & Duties

A doula can characteristically be classified into three types: prenatal doula, childbirth doula and postpartum doula. Based on the qualification, a doula may assist a pregnant woman before child birth by getting her necessary commodities and preparing her to deliver a baby. A childbirth doula, does just that, i.e. helps a pregnant woman deliver a baby. Her role may include assisting the mother during childbirth by supporting her emotionally etc. However, a postpartum doula can help a mother after child birth with all the essential chores at home, including but not limited to cooking, caring for the child, assisting in breast feeding etc.

Typically, there are two types of midwives: Direct-entry midwives, who usually enter directly into midwifery education programs without a prior professional credential and Certified nurse-midwives who are registered nurses before entering midwifery training. A midwife’s duties include helping child bearing women during labor, childbirth and providing postpartum care until the baby is six weeks old.

Etymology

The word Doula is derived from the Ancient Greek word doulē, meaning female slave.

The term Midwife is derived from Middle English word mid meaning with an Old English word wif meaning woman.

Salary

An experienced doula can earn anywhere from $300 to $1000 a time in the United States of America. These rates are flexible and usually depend on the cost of living of the area where the service is being delivered.

A midwife however, can make up to $40,000 – $90,000 a year in the United States of America. The amount mentioned is the base pay and can differ based on your employer, industry, credentials, experience etc.

Certification

Though it isn’t essential for a doula to be certified by an agency or an institution, many women prefer their doulas to meet some basic requirements. These requirements can be fulfilled from various doula certifying agencies across the country or even by appearing for exams over the internet. Doulas need to attend specific number of births before they can be certified, which varies from agency to agency. A few agencies in the United States are : Childbirth International and Doulas of North America.

Midwives can be certified through North American Registry of Midwives for Certified Professional Midwife, American College of Nurse Midwives for Certified Nurse-Midwife.

References

¿Que es una Doula posparto?

Evidencia de la investigación muestra que los servicios de calidad de una doula posparto puede facilitar la transición que viene con la adición de un bebé a una familia, mejorar la satisfacción de los padres y reducen el riesgo de trastornos del estado de ánimo.

Una doula posparto

  • Ofrece educación, compañerismo y apoyo sin prejuicios durante el posparto cuarto trimestre
  • Ayuda con la atención del recién nacido, el ajuste de la familia, la preparación de alimentos y poner en orden la casa de luz
  • Ofrece información basada en la evidencia sobre la alimentación infantil, la recuperación emocional y física desde el nacimiento, bebé calmante y habilidades de afrontamiento para los nuevos padres y hace referencias apropiadas cuando sea necesario.

¿Qué es una doula?

La palabra “doula” viene del antiguo griego y significa “una mujer que sirve”, y ahora se utiliza para referirse a un profesional capacitado y con experiencia que ofrece apoyo físico, emocional y de información continua a la madre antes, durante y justo después del nacimiento; o que brinda apoyo emocional y práctico durante el puerperio.

Los estudios han demostrado que cuando las doulas asisten nacimiento, partos son más cortos con menos complicaciones, los bebés son más sanos y que amamantan más fácilmente.

Una Doula Nacimiento

  • Reconoce nacimiento como una experiencia clave la madre recordará toda su vida
  • Entiende la fisiología del parto y las necesidades emocionales de una mujer en trabajo de parto
  • Ayuda a la mujer en la preparación y la realización de sus planes para el nacimiento
  • Estancias con la mujer durante todo el trabajo
  • Proporciona apoyo emocional, medidas de comodidad física y un punto de vista objetivo, además de ayudar a la mujer a obtener la información que necesita para tomar decisiones informadas
  • Facilita la comunicación entre la parturienta, su pareja y sus proveedores de atención clínica
  • Percibe su papel de nutrir y proteger la memoria de la experiencia del nacimiento de la mujer
  • Permite que la pareja de la mujer a participar en su / su nivel de comodidad

 

YtheGarcia?

download-e1449212833672Yasmintheresa is a Midwife in training who has trained with the Farm Midwives from Summertown, Tennessee; UmmSalaamah Abdullah-Zaimah, Pamela Hunt, Deborah Flowers. She is a DONA trained Prenatal & Postnatal Doula, and Childbirth Educator who is gaining experience to become a Certified Professional Midwife.

www.ythegarcia.com

Holds current certifications in,

 

After completing 3 years in College in pursuit of becoming a Clinical Dietitian focused on maternity she realized her calling was to become a Certified Professional Midwife. She then began her new journey as a Birth worker.

Yasmintheresa realized her passion for research in reproductive science at the early age of 13. Shortly after her her right of passage into womanhood she expected to receive a guidebook on how to care for herself but all she received was an offer to pick up some pads from the store from her mum. Growing up in a house predominantly full of women; she didn’t receive a crash course on how to embrace the early stages of woman hood therefore Yasmintheresa relied on her own research on how to understand her evolving body.  Today she prides herself in serving women, eager to understand and embrace the magic that happens in their bodies.

As a Doula, she provides educational, motivational and emotional support to parents. Her mission is to help make a parent’s most memorable moment comforting and harmonious.

When she is not serving as a Doula, Yasmintheresa studies, subjects such as Midwifery, Dietetics, Metaphysics, Naturopathy, Birth practices throughout different cultures, and writes opinion & research based articles for health & wellness.

Meant to be a Doula

It is no surprise to me that I have ended up here as a protégé of midwifery services. At the age of 14 was when my obsession with the miraculous act of child birth began. I remember watching everything that had to do with child birth on the te-lie-vision (tv) and doing independent research on how my body will one day experience the magic itself. Then was when my journey to becoming a sexual reproduction educator and doula began. I do also recall being a very eager 12 year old wanting to know exactly what was happening to my body the moment I got my first period. Yes, I was that person who googled everything and joined the mailing list on those tween websites to receive free tampons and pads. They also gave cool diagrams and coloring books to know exactly how your uterus functioned! Who wouldn’t want that as keep sake?

Habits create a life style…

Oddly enough I can remember my first science project for my freshman year science fair. My project was based on the reproduction cycles of both men and woman which was followed by a presentation of both female and male contraceptives. How ironic, I know. Today I don’t believe in contraceptives. I have learned there are many different forms of contraceptives that don’t come out of a box. We’ll get to that later.  I was pretty pretentious to go out in front of the whole school, try and teach everyone about sex and contraceptives while being a virgin. I guess you can really say those who don’t do, teach.

Welcoming womanhood…

Now through the coming of a woman journey that I have experienced throughout the few decades of living on this earth, I have finally realized what truly made me happy to wake up each morning and motivated me to live each day. It was the reality of life being born around us every second. Within finding myself as a woman through mile stones, hardships and exploring the greatness in my sexuality I had made a decision to be a part of the Welcoming life Crew. (WLC includes, OBGs, Midwives, Doulas, Nurses, Witch Doctors) whatever you shall call them if they deliver or assist in delivering new life they are a part of that crew that I just made up, Welcoming Life Crew.

Being Proactic

Destiny is not a matter of chance, but of choice. Not something to wish for, but to attain.                          – William Jennings Bryan

A few months ago when I looked at my life and what I was doing; I realized I wasn’t fulfilling something inside of me. I worked for the 9th biggest company in this country and I felt as if I was dying inside. One day after watching a documentary by Rikki Lake and Abby Epstein, “The Business of Being Born”. I instantly knew why I was so passionate about birth and “Welcoming Life” into this world. >>What went through my mind was, Every time a new life is born into this world is another message being told to us by the Universe, by God, by a Higher Power that it hasn’t given up on us. In that moment I knew that I wanted to be a part of that message. I want to be the advocate of New Life being born into this world with a chance of a better tomorrow or at least a better today. This is why I am on my journey to being a DONA certified Doula with emphasis on natural birth because I was born to serve my people, my sisters and empower them to do what they biologically were born to do.  ~YtheG